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Maine West Student Handbook

MAINE WEST HIGH SCHOOL

2020-2021

STUDENT HANDBOOK

All students are required to complete a Handbook Acknowledgement Form to acknowledge receipt of the Behavioral Support Guidelines and Procedures, Extracurricular Code of Conduct and Graduation Requirements and the Remote Learning Guidelines as contained in the 2020-2021 MWHS Student Handbook. 

Students are also asked to acknowledge the risks of hazing, bullying (includes cyberbullying), harassment, intimidation and initiation activities and have been informed of the zero tolerance of these behaviors at Maine West High School.

Students are asked to commit to lead by example and not support, condone or participate in any hazing activities throughout involvement in student organizations and athletic teams.

Maine Township High School District 207 – Philosophy

Maine Township District 207 schools offer a comprehensive curriculum with the goals of inspiring students’ curiosities and helping each student develop the academic, social, and emotional skills to reach his or her full potential.  These ideas are reflected in the District 207 Vision of Learning developed by our community stakeholders.

Based on the idea that student inquiry should drive learning in the classroom in a setting that emphasizes learning together, the foundation of our academic program is inquiry-based and cooperative in its approach.  In an effort to meet students where they are as they enter our schools and improve their learning to the greatest extent in the short time we have the privilege to work with them, all of our certified staff have been trained in the Johnson and Johnson model of cooperative learning, assessment literacy practices based on Stiggins, Chappuis, and Arter, the grading practices of Wormeli, O’Connor and Gusky, differentiated instruction based on the work of Tomlinson, and personalized learning strategies based on the work of Horn and Staker.

Maine Township High School District 207 Board of Education

Paula Besler (President), Aurora  Austriaco (Vice President), Teri Collins, Linda Coyle, Jin Lee, Carla Owen and Sheila Yousuf-Abramson.

Unless otherwise advised, all meetings will begin at 6:00 p.m., and will be held in the Board Room of the District 207 Administration Center, 1177 South Dee Road, Park Ridge.

Maine Township High School District 207 Administration

Dr. Kenneth Wallace, Superintendent

George Dagres, Director of Human Resources

Gregory Dietz, Assistant Superintendent – General Administration

Dr. Kathleen Di Sanza, Assistant Superintendent for Student Services

Dr. Jill Geocaris, Director of Adult Learning

Mary Kalou, Assistant Superintendent – Business

Shawn Messmer, Assistant Superintendent – Curriculum & Innovation

Dr. Kelly Morrissey, Director of Personal Learning and Student Support

Maine West High School

Administration

PrincipalDr. Eileen McMahon

Associate Principal for Human Resources & Instructional OperationsMr. Matthew Parrilli

Associate Principal for Student Experiences – Mr. John Aldworth

Associate Principal for Student & Family ServicesDr. Claudia Rueda-Alvarez

Associate Principal for Teaching & Learning – Dr. Jennifer Loika

Assistant Principal for Student SupportMr. Brian Packowitz

Assistant Principal for Student SupportMs. Cristina Ramirez

Assistant Principal for Student SupportMr. Rich Wolf

Athletic DirectorMr. Jarett Kirshner

Department Chairs

Career and Technical EducationMs. Samantha Archer

Driver’s EducationDr. Jennifer Loika

EnglishDr. Timothy Pappageorge

ELL/Bilingual & World LanguagesMr. Alan Matan

Fine ArtsMr. Pat Barnett

MathematicsMr. Mike Smith

ScienceMr. Derrick Swistak

Social ScienceMs. Susan Gahagan-Mueller

Special EducationMs. Lisa Murphy

Student and Family Services

CounselorMs. Gilit Abraham

CounselorMs. Allyson Adams

CounselorMs. Carla Bader

CounselorMr. Shamoon Ebrahimi

CounselorMs. Rosanna Giricz

CounselorMs. Jalaine Hart

CounselorMr. Eliades Hernandez

CounselorMs. Elizabeth Hoover

CounselorMr. Alain Roy

Social WorkerMs. Hannah Roe

Social WorkerMs. Sara Wadhwa

PsychologistMs. Nora Feyerer

PsychologistMs. Sandy Flores-Rodriguez

PsychologistMs. Lynn Perri

PsychologistMr. Brian Spicer

Career & College SpecialistMs. Amelia Manning

Integrated Career Services CoordinatorMs. Kayla Hansen

Additional Services

Director of Building & GroundsMr. John Gutka

Bookstore ManagerMs. Pati Coy

Key Information for Home Learning

In order to provide the most up-to-date information for our students and families, all key information for home learning can be found using the links below:

Attendance/Logging into Infinite Campus virtual check-in directions

Covid self certificationdirections and direct link for self certification

Where do I go for Interactive PDF link to access many supports 

Student Dashboardlinks to areas mentioned above, as well as links to Google and tech tutorials

Opening of School Plan and GuidelinesRoadmap to Reopening

Livestreamed and Recorded LessonsInformation about Google Meet and/or Zoom lessons

westhomelearning

Student & Family Services

The Student Services Department provides many services to students and parents including a four-year developmental guidance program that ensures every student in the school receives the same curriculum related to guidance. We encourage you to visit our website by going to the Maine West website Academics tab and clicking on the Student Services department. Many of the guidance-related activities are initiated by students, parents and school personnel as needed. Counselors try to anticipate and react to the needs of students and parents. However, for counselors to be most effective, it is important that there be open communication between the home and school. 

Parents may make an appointment by calling the counselor to whom the student is assigned.  A number of specialists are available to assist students and their families. The school social worker, psychologist, nurse, reading consultant, speech therapist, and special education staff are available on recommendation or referral basis through the counselor. Parents may also contact the social worker directly.  Our career specialist is a resource person for students, parents and staff.

Additionally, Maine West High School has a Family Center (Extended Services Programs) that provides a number of social work services including evening hours and programs to accommodate students and families who are unable to meet during the traditional school day. The Family Center is also a place to find help locating community resources and services when needed.

Health Office 

Health services are available to students, parents and staff from 7:30 a.m. until 3:30 p.m.  In addition to direct care, nursing services include vision and hearing screening, health education and counseling, medical referrals and follow-up. Individual student health records, as well as any paperwork or documentation of a medical or health-related nature, are confidentially maintained in the school Health Office. Doctor’s notes and PE excuses are also handled through the Health Office.

State Health Requirements

Illinois state law requires a complete physical examination within one year prior to the first day of school for all students entering 9th grade for the first time, as well as for all new/transfer students.  In addition to the physical exam, new freshman and transfer students must also submit proof of immunization or immunity against the following diseases:

Diphtheria, Poliomyelitis, Hepatitis B, Pertussis, Mumps, Varicella, Tetanus, Measles, Meningococcal, Tdap, Rubella

Students who fail to meet the Illinois health requirements regarding physical examination and/or immunizations will not be allowed to purchase books or attend school until state requirements are met.

Students who participate in school sports are required to have an annual sports physical.  Additional health examinations or medical evaluations and school exclusions may also be warranted under special circumstances: for example, a student may be excluded from school for a contagious disease or condition that might pose a health risk to other members of the school community.

Illness/Injured at School

If a student becomes ill/injured at school, he/she should report to the Health Office with a pass from the teacher to be evaluated by the nurse. Before a student who has taken ill or becomes injured in school is sent home, the Health Office will confer with his/her parent, guardian or emergency contacts as designated by parents to arrange for his/her transportation. Parental consent is needed whether or not the student can provide his/her own transportation.

Medications

Students should not take medication during school hours unless it is necessary for a student’s health and well-being.  When a student’s licensed health care provider and parent/guardian believe that it is necessary for a student to take medication during school hours whether it be prescription medication or OTC (over the counter) medications such as Tylenol, an Authorization and Permission for Administration of Medication form must be completed by their physician and signed by a parent/guardian.  Medication must be brought to school in a container properly labeled by the pharmacy or OTC medication should be in their original containers and given to the School Nurse to dispense as per the licensed health care provider’s written order.

A student may possess an epinephrine auto-injector (EpiPen) and/or asthma inhaler medication for immediate use at the student’s discretion, provided that the Authorization and Permission for Administration of Medication form has been completed by their physician and signed by parent/guardian.

All medication brought to school must be in the original container and labeled with the student’s name. Written permission for prescribed or non-prescribed (OTC) medications at school must be renewed annually.  Questions about specific medication procedures should be directed to the school nurse.  The purpose of these procedures is to limit medication use at school, yet assure safe administration of medications for those students who require them.

School-Based Health Center

The Maine Township School-Based Health Center, housed at Maine East High School, is a partnership between Maine Township District 207 and Advocate Medical Group, in affiliation with Advocate Lutheran General Hospital.  The goal of the School-Based Health Center is to improve the physical and emotional health of students attending Maine East, Maine West and Maine South High Schools. 

Students must have a signed parental/guardian consent form on file before they can receive services at the School-Based Health Center.

The School-Based Health Center is located on the lower level of Maine East High School.  Health Center staff includes a full-time nurse practitioner, a full-time mental health worker, a part-time physician and a secretary.  The Health Center is open Monday through Friday during the school year and Mondays through Thursdays during the summer months. 

Most services provided at the Health Center, except for those noted below, are provided free of charge.

The staff of the School-Based Health Center considers parental involvement important. Every student is encouraged to involve parent(s)/guardian(s) in health care decisions.  The services available are basically the same as at any doctor’s office. 

The services available at the School-Based Health Center will include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • General Health Assessment
  • Routine Physicals ($35, if there is not state Medicaid)
  • Sports and Employment Physicals ($35, if there is no state Medicaid)
  • Health Screenings                  
  • Immunizations                                   
  • Assessment of stress/emotional problems
  • Individual and Family Counseling        
  • Assessment of Alcohol and Drug Problems
  • Infections                                
  • Counseling on Emotional, Behavioral and Adjustment Related Issues
  • Earaches                                   
  • Sprains, Cuts, Burns
  • Sore Throats                              
  • Throat Cultures 

Student Records

Access to Student Records

School student records or information contained in them may be released, transferred, disclosed or otherwise disseminated, to a parent or student or person specifically designated as a representative by a parent.

Records may also be released to an employee or official of the school or school district or the State Board of Education with a current demonstrable educational or administrative interest in the student, in furtherance of such interest.

Records may also be released to the official records custodian of another school in which the student has enrolled or intends to enroll, provided that the parent receives prior written notice of the nature and substance of the information to be transferred and opportunity to inspect, copy and challenge such information.  If the address of the parents is unknown, notice may be served upon the records custodian of the requesting school for transmittal to the parents.  Such service shall be deemed conclusive, and 10 school days after such service, if the parents make no objection, the records may be transferred to the requesting school.

Records may also be released to any person for the purpose of research, statistical reporting or planning, provided that no student or parent can be identified from the information released and the person(s) requesting the use of such information has signed an affidavit agreeing to comply with all rules and statutes regarding school records.

Records may also be released pursuant to a court order, provided that the parent shall be given prompt written notice upon receipt of such order, of the terms of the order, the nature and substance of the information proposed to be released in compliance with such order, an opportunity to inspect, copy and challenge the contents of the school student records.

Records may also be released to any person as specifically required by state or federal law, provided that the person furnishes the school with appropriate identification and a copy of the statute authorizing such access and that the parent receives prior written notice of the nature and substance of the information to be released and an opportunity to inspect, copy and challenge such information.  If the release of information relates to more than 25 students, such prior notice may be given in a local newspaper of general circulation or other publication directed generally to parents.

Records may also be released subject to regulations of the State Board, in connection with an emergency to appropriate persons if the knowledge of such information is necessary to protect the health or safety of the student or other persons, provided that the parents are notified as soon as possible of the information released, the date of release, the person, agency, or organization receiving the information, and the purpose of the release.

Records may also be released to any person with the prior specific dated and written consent of the parent designating the person to whom the records may be released and the designated records or designated portions of the information to be released.  The parent has the right to inspect, copy and challenge the records and to limit any such consent to designated records or designated portions of the information contained within the records.

Except for the student and his parents, no person to whom information is released and no person specifically designated as a representative by a parent may permit any other person to have access to such information without the prior consent of the parents.

A record of any release of information must be maintained for the life of the school student records and must be available only to the parents and the official records custodian.  The record of release shall include the nature and substance of the information released, the name of the person requesting such information, the capacity in which such a request has been made, the purpose of such request, the date of the release, the name and signature of the official records custodian releasing such information and a copy of any consent to such release.

Challenging Records

If the accuracy, relevancy or propriety of any entry in the school student records, exclusive of grades, is challenged, parents may request a hearing with the school.  The request for a hearing must be submitted in writing to the school and contain notice of the specific entry or entries to be challenged and the basis of the challenge.  An informal conference will be held within 15 school days of receipt of the request for a hearing.  If the challenge is not resolved by the informal conference, a formal hearing shall be initiated.

In case of a formal hearing, a hearing officer, who is not employed in the attendance center in which the student is enrolled, shall be appointed by the school and shall conduct a hearing within a reasonable time but no later than 15 days after the informal conference, unless an extension of time is agreed upon by the parents and school officials.  The hearing officer shall notify the parents and school officials of the time and place of the hearing.  Each party shall have the right to present evidence and to call witnesses, the right to cross-examine witnesses, and the right to counsel.  A record of the hearing shall be made by tape recording or by a court reporter.  The decision of the hearing officer shall be rendered no later than 10 school days after the conclusion of the hearing and shall be transmitted to the parents and the school district.  The hearing officer’s decision shall be based solely on the evidence presented at the hearing and shall order (a) retention of the challenged contents of the student record; or (b) removal of the challenged contents of the student record, or (c) change, clarification or addition to the challenged contents of the student record.  The parties shall have the right to appeal the decision of the hearing officer to the Regional Superintendent of Schools.

If there is an appeal, notice of appeal must be presented to the Regional Superintendent of Schools within 20 school days after the decision of the hearing officer.  The opposing party shall be notified of the appeal at the same time.  Within 10 school days, the school shall forward a transcript of the hearing, a copy of the record entry in question, and any other pertinent materials to the Regional Superintendent of Schools.  Upon receipt of such documents, the Regional Superintendent of Schools shall examine the documents and record, make findings and issue a decision to the parents and the school district within 20 school days of receipt of the documents.  If the subject of the appeal involves the accuracy, relevance or propriety of any entry in special education records, the Regional Superintendent of Schools should seek advice from appropriate special education personnel who were not authors of the entry.  The school shall be responsible for implementing the decision of the Regional Superintendent of Schools.  Such decision shall be final, and may be appealed to the Circuit Court of the county in which the school is located.

A complaint regarding compliance with the federal law and regulations on student records may also be filed with the United States Department of Education under Section 99.64 of the department’s Family and Educational Rights and Privacy Regulations.

Parents may insert in their student’s record a statement of reasonable length setting forth their position on any disputed information contained in that record.  The school shall include a copy of such statement in any subsequent dissemination of the information in dispute.

Permanent Records

Permanent records consist of basic identifying information, academic transcript, attendance record, accident reports and health record, record of release of permanent record information, and may also consist of records of awards and participation in school-sponsored activities and college entrance examination scores.  No other information will be placed in the student permanent record.  Permanent records are maintained for not less than 60 years after the student has transferred, graduated or otherwise permanently withdrawn from the school.

Records for Students with Disabilities

Upon graduation or permanent withdrawal of a disabled student, psychological evaluations, special education files and other information contained in the student temporary record which may be a continued assistance to the student may, after five years, be transferred to the custody of the parent or student if the student has succeeded to the rights of the parents.  The school will explain to the student and the parent the future usefulness of psychological evaluations, special education files and other information contained in the student temporary record.

Student temporary records will be destroyed no later than July 1 of the fifth year after the student’s permanent withdrawal from educational programs or graduation, whichever occurs first.  Records will also be reviewed at the end of twelfth grade or upon a student’s change in attendance center, whichever occurs first, to verify entries and to eliminate or correct all out-of-date misleading, inaccurate, unnecessary or irrelevant information.

Release of Student Record Information

Directory information may be released to the general public unless the parent requests that any or all such information not be released.  It includes name and address, gender, grade level, birth date and place, parent’s name and address, academic awards, degrees and honors, information in relation to school-sponsored activities, organizations and athletics, the student’s major field of study, and period of attendance in the school.  No person may condition the granting or withholding of any right, privilege or benefit or make as a condition of employment, credit or insurance the securing by any individual of any individual of any information from a student’s temporary record which such individual may obtain through the exercise of any right secured under the Illinois School Student Records Act.

Students Who Reach the Age of 18

All rights and privileges accorded a parent under the Illinois School Student Records Act shall become exclusively those of the student upon his or her 18th birthday, graduation from secondary school, marriage or entry into military service, whichever occurs first.  Such rights and privileges may also be exercised by the student at any time with respect to the student’s permanent school record.  Parents of students who are 18 and older should share this information with them.

Temporary Records

Temporary records consist of all information that is of clear relevance to the education of the student, but is not required to be in the student permanent record.  It may include family background information, intelligence test scores, aptitude test scores, discipline records, psychological and personality test results, and teacher evaluations of student performance.  Special education records are also considered a temporary record.  A record of release of temporary record information must be included in the student temporary record.  The temporary record will be reviewed for elimination of out-of-date, inaccurate or unnecessary information every four years or upon a student’s change in attendance centers, whichever occurs first.  Schools by law do not maintain temporary records for longer than five years after the student has transferred, graduated or otherwise permanently withdrawn from the school.

Viewing Records

Parents will be given reasonable prior notice before any school student record is destroyed or information is deleted and have an opportunity to copy the record or information.  Parents, or any person specifically designated as a representative by a parent, have the right to inspect and copy all permanent and temporary records within a reasonable time-in no case later than 10 school days after the date of receipt of such request by the official records custodian.  Students also have the right to inspect and copy their school student permanent records as well as their temporary records.  The cost of copying school student permanent records and/or temporary records must not exceed 35 cents per page.

At the option of either the parent or the school, a qualified professional, who may be a psychologist, counselor, or other advisor, and who may be an employee of the school or employed by the parent, may be present to interpret the information contained in the student temporary record.  The school secures and pays for the cost of the services of any district-employed professional whether the professional is there at the request of the parent or the school.  Students and parents may obtain copies of their records by requesting them in writing.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

Credit

Maine West High School has courses that are one quarter, one semester and two semesters in length. One quarter credit in all one quarter courses and one-half credit in all one-semester courses, with the exception of physical education, is granted upon successful completion of the course. Most courses are two semesters in duration. One credit is granted upon the successful completion of both semesters.  It is recommended that students be enrolled in six (6) courses and physical education for each semester of attendance.

Grade Point Averages (GPA)

Grade point averages are used by the school to select students as Maine Scholars, members of National Honor Society, and for other distinctions of educational achievement. The information is also used on official transcripts to colleges and universities and is intended to assist in the evaluation of educational achievement of Maine graduates.

Students weighted and non-weighted grade point averages are listed on transcripts.  The non-weighted GPA would give the exact same value to every course. Selection of Maine Scholars and Honor Roll designees will be based on the weighted GPA.

Grading System

Grades earned for each semester are entered on the permanent record and are cumulative.  They represent the quality and quantity of work completed and the degree of mastery of the subject and are expressed in letters.

A – A grade indicating that the student has done work of exceptional quality.

B – A grade indicating that the student has done above average work.

C – A grade indicating that the student has done satisfactory work.

D – A grade indicating that the student has done below average work.

F – A grade that carries no credit indicating that the student has not met the minimum requirement of the course.

EX – A grade that carries no credit indicating that the student has been excused from a requirement by the Assistant Principal for Student Services.

X – A grade that carries no credit indicating that the student has an opportunity to secure a passing grade by doing satisfactory work during the subsequent ten-week period.  Used sparingly, it is intended for students who enter too late to complete enough work to receive a grade.  Conditional grades may be given at the end of the first, second or third quarters of two semester classes or at the end of the first quarter of one semester classes.

IN – A grade that carries no credit indicating that the student has not completed the work because of illness.  An “IN” (incomplete) at the end of a semester must be made up within the first six weeks of the following semester or a failure is automatically recorded.

NG – A grade that carries no credit and may be used in situations where a student is auditing a class that has been approved in advance by the Assistant Principal, Student Services or the Executive Committee.

PA – A grade that indicates a student is passing a course that is being taken pass/fail.

 The Executive Committee will respond to all requests to withdraw from courses.  A course that is dropped during any quarter will either not appear on the student’s permanent record or will be recorded as a failure “F” based upon the following guidelines:

  • Any course that is dropped because of a scheduling error or to balance class size will not appear on the student’s permanent record.
  • Any course that is dropped with the approval of the Executive Committee while the student is passing will not appear on the student’s permanent record.
  • Any course that is dropped while the student is failing will be recorded as failure, “F”.
  • Any request to drop a course after the ninth week of school will be denied unless extenuating circumstances can be demonstrated.

Graduation Ceremony    

Maine Township High School East, South and West each have one graduation ceremony. Graduating seniors receive standard diplomas. Diplomas from the three Maine Township high schools differ from another only in the identification of the school.  No diploma refers to the course of study pursued by the graduate nor to the graduate’s academic record.

How the Honor Roll Is Determined

Students making a 4.0 or above grade average, with no grades below a B, will be named to the High Honor Roll.  Students making a 3.0 or above average, with no grades below a C, will be named to the Honor Roll.  All courses except for physical education and driver education are considered.  Failures, D’s, or an incomplete in any one-half or full credit course disqualify a student for the honor roll.  A student must carry a minimum of five solids to be eligible for the honor roll.  Enrollment in a pass/fail course does not disqualify a student for either honor roll unless the student receives a grade of “F” in the pass/fail course.

IHSA and NCAA Eligibility

The Illinois High School Athletic Association (IHSA) and the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) both have rules and regulations regarding eligibility.  Students who participate in athletics in high school and/or wish to participate in athletics at the college level should be aware of the requirements of both associations. 

NCAA eligibility rules may be found at www.ncaa.org (eligibility center) or students may see their counselor or the Athletic Director for more information.

No Pass/No Play Policy:  Academic Eligibility Standards

The Board of Education will prohibit any student who does not meet an academic eligibility standard from participating in an extracurricular team/organization that represents a Maine Township school in competition against another school. The academic eligibility standard is defined as:

  • Student must be passing twenty (25) credit hours of high school work per week.  In District 207, this translates to five (5) full credit courses, including Physical Education and excluding Driver Education.
  • Student must have passed and received credit toward graduation for twenty (25) credit hours of high school work for the entire previous semester in order to be eligible at all during the ensuing semester.  In District 207 this again translates to five (5) full credit courses, including Physical Education and excluding Driver Education.
  • Quarter credit classes (Oral Communications and Consumer Education) must be taken in the same semester to count as one full credit course for semester and weekly eligibility.

A Student must meet these standards to be eligible.  Once meeting the initial eligibility standard based on the previous semester’s credit, the student must continue to maintain eligibility on a week-by week basis.  The superintendent shall establish administrative procedures to implement the policy. 

Pass/Fail Procedure

The pass/fail procedure was developed to give students new opportunities for learning without the pressure of grades. Passing grades received under the pass/fail system are designated on grade reports and official transcripts as satisfactory (PA). The Passing grade (PA) does not affect a student’s grade point average. However, a failing grade received under the pass/fail system is designated on grade reports and official transcripts as an “F.” A failing (F) grade will be computed in a student’s total grade point average. Students may take any one-half credit or one credit course during the regular school year, as well as summer school, pass/fail according to the following guidelines: 

  • Students may petition to take courses pass/fail only if they are registered for more than four full credit courses. If a student who is taking a fifth course pass/fail decides to drop a course that is being taken for a letter grade, the pass/fail course must be taken for a letter grade.
  • Students must meet all prerequisites for admission to any class they wish to take pass/fail.
  • Accelerated classes and Advanced Placement may not be taken pass/fail.
  • Courses required for graduation may not be taken pass/fail except for courses taken to complete the two-year graduation requirement in applied arts and technology, fine arts, or foreign language.

Social Promotion

The Board of Education will promote students based on students meeting the goals and standards of District 207 as embodied in the curriculum of courses of study offered by the district or in courses of study demonstrated to be comparable to that of the district. In order to be promoted from 9th to 10th grade, a student must pass five units of credit. In order to be promoted from 10th to 11th grade, a student must pass eleven units of credit. In order to be promoted from 11th to 12th grade, a student must pass seventeen units of credit. 

Student Progress

Progress reports are issued at three intervals (4 week, 8 week and 12 week) each semester.  A semester report card is issued at the conclusion of each semester. In addition to the grades, report cards and progress reports also show the total number of days absent as recorded by the attendance office for each grading period and the number of absences for each class as recorded by each teacher.

Parents and students are able to view course progress via the Parent Portal on the school website.  Teachers will keep parents informed when a student’s progress falls below the minimum level at which a passing grade can be given.  Parents are encouraged to communicate with teachers as necessary.

Transfer Students

Most credits of students transferring into Maine West High School are accepted, providing the school from which they transfer is accredited by its regional accrediting agency.  If the school is not accredited, the student may receive credit upon successful completion of examinations and further investigation of the curriculum.

Assignment of credit from the transfer school will be determined by the high school administration.

Transfer Student Graduation

To make the diploma earned by each graduating senior from Maine West High School more meaningful, the Board of Education encourages students who transfer into or from Maine West during the last semester of the senior year to obtain a diploma from the school where they received the majority of their education.

Students who transfer into Maine West High School during the last semester of their senior year may complete their high school education with the understanding that the Maine principal will try to reach an agreement with the principal of the student’s former school to issue a diploma.  If such an agreement is not reached, the Maine principal will reevaluate the student’s academic record.  If the student has met the state and district requirements for graduation, the principal will prepare and issue a diploma.

With prior approval, students who transfer from Maine West High School during the last semester of their senior year may receive a diploma from Maine West.  Students must present evidence that course work for a diploma from Maine West has been satisfactorily completed at another approved secondary institution.  Responsibility for initiating the granting of a diploma under this policy rests with the student or principal at the school to which the student transferred

Repeat Course Policy

When a student repeats any course, the transcript will reflect all courses and all grades. The calculation of the grade point average (GPA), however, will include only the highest grade for the repeated course.

Requirements for Graduation

In order to graduate from the Maine Township high schools, students must earn a minimum of 23.25 units of credit including:

  • Four units of English.
  • Three units* of mathematics.  Computer courses and business mathematics do not meet the three unit requirements in mathematics.
  • Three units* in courses offered by the social science department, including one unit in U.S. history and one-half (1/2) unit in government.
  • Three units* of a laboratory science.
  • Satisfactory completion of one-fourth (1/4) unit, or exemption from, physical education during each semester of high school enrollment with the exception of one semester during the sophomore year when all students are required to enroll in health.  The grade point average does not include physical education.
  • Satisfactory completion of one-half (1/2) unit of health.  The grade point average does include the health grade.
  • Satisfactory completion of one-quarter (1/4) unit of consumer education.  Successful completion of a course in introduction to business, independent living or economics exempts students from the 1/4 unit requirement of consumer education.  The cumulative grade point average includes the consumer education grade.
  • Thirty (30) hours of instruction in safety education (driver education classroom instruction).  The driver education course grants one-half (1/2) unit of credit if taken in one of the Maine Township high schools; the district may waive this requirement upon presentation of successful completion of a driver education course from a private agency.  The grade point average does not include driver education.
  • Two units of credit from any of the following:  fine arts (art, music, speech and drama), foreign language or career and technical education (family and consumer sciences, business and applied technology).
  • One-quarter (1/4) unit of oral communication.  Participation in the speech team does not fulfill the oral communication requirement.  The cumulative grade point average includes the oral communication grade.
  • Pass an examination on the Declaration of Independence, the flag of the United States, the Constitution of the United States and the Constitution of the State of Illinois.
  • A minimum of 5 units of elective credit.

In addition to fulfilling the above requirements, in order to obtain a district diploma, students must take the required state examination.  Exceptions to this requirement will be permitted if:  (i) the student’s individualized education program (IEP) developed pursuant to Article 14 of the Illinois School Code and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act identifies the state examination as inappropriate for the student; (ii) the student qualifies for exemption from the state examination pursuant to Section 2-3.64(a) of the Illinois School Code due to the student’s lack of English language proficiency.

*Unless there are otherwise compelling reasons, the expectation of District 207 is that all students will take the increased core curriculum classes in math, social science and laboratory science.  Parents may file an appeal for variance with the principal’s representative in each school between June 30 following a student’s freshman year and June 30 following a student’s junior year.

 

ALTERNATIVE CREDIT LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES

Alliance for Lifelong Learning (Evening High School)

Maine West High School may accept credit earned by a student through Alliance for Lifelong Learning (ALL) evening high school and transferred credit from other high schools.

On-line Courses

However, students may earn up to six credits (with no more than two to satisfy graduation requirements in the four core areas (English, Math, Science, Social Science) through approved correspondence, internet-based courses or post-secondary courses.  The Superintendent of Schools may make exceptions.

Summer School

Maine West High School provides a comprehensive summer program in both academic and non-academic areas, as well as those courses that meet special interests.  Summer session courses taken for credit are acceptable toward graduation.  Students may use summer school to take courses they are otherwise unable to schedule into their programs or to make up credit that they missed during the regular school year.  All summer school courses meet the time requirements of accrediting agencies.

POST HIGH SCHOOL PLANNING

Accreditation

Maine West High School is accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools and the Illinois State Board of Education.

Career Resource Center

The Career-College Resource Center (CCRC) located in the LRC provides a wealth of information about career and college options. Resources include several computer-based career and college search programs, printed and audio-visual materials, part-time employment opportunities, career exploration such as internships and shadowing opportunities, military careers and an extensive collection of books and pamphlets on careers, colleges, technical schools, scholarships and financial aid.  Appointments for juniors and seniors to meet with more than one hundred college representatives are scheduled through the CCRC.  Our Career and College Admissions Specialist works together with the Career Coordinator and your child’s counselor to assist students and families as they explore post-high school options. The Career-College Admission Specialist is available to assist students and families during our regularly scheduled school hours as well as evenings and weekends by appointment. . The CCRC is open from 7:30 am to 3:30 pm daily.  The CCRC phone number is (847) 803-5810.

How To Prepare for College and the Working World

As students prepare for the working world, they need to consider their interests, abilities, personality and values among other factors to allow them to make educated career choices.  In order to help our students accomplish this goal, the counseling staff works with each student on developing an Individual Career Plan (ICP) that contains the results of surveys used to identify career pathways that the student has shown an interest.  Additionally, elective courses and clubs and activities at Maine West have been aligned to career pathways to help students choose those courses and activities that may help them with further career exploration.  We encourage our students to also sign up for other important career opportunities such as internships. Our Career Coordinator can help students secure internships and other meaningful career experiences. The Career Coordinator is available to help students throughout the school year and summer. The Career Coordinator’s office is also located in the CCRC.

Some careers will require a four-year degree.  For those that do, a minimum of four years of English, three years of social science, two years of the same foreign language, three years of laboratory science, and three years of college prep mathematics including algebra, geometry, and algebra II are required.

Highly selective schools or specific areas of study such as engineering may have additional requirements. College options do exist for students who do not meet some of these requirements. It is strongly recommended that all students enroll in the most rigorous academic program available to them.  

Many midwestern colleges and universities require twelve units of college preparatory work, class rank in the upper half, and satisfactory scores on either the ACT (American College Test) or SAT (Scholastic Aptitude Test).  Students usually take these tests in the spring of their junior year in high school.  Students are urged to discuss their plans with their counselor and the Career College Admission Specialist.  

Students may also consult the resources in the CCRC to do further investigation of specific entrance and graduation requirements at schools as well as research about financial aid and careers.  In addition, we recommend the following free websites:

www.petersons.com
www.isac.org
www.collegeboard.org
www.fastweb.com

State Universities In Illinois

The minimum college admission requirements for a baccalaureate degree program in Illinois vary somewhat among the ten institutions.  Students and parents should check with individual Illinois public colleges and universities to verify the high school courses required for admission.

Work Permits

Students wishing to obtain a work permit should go to the Student Services Office.  Students must have secured a job before a work permit can be issued.

LIBRARY RESOURCE CENTER (LRC) GUIDELINES

The LRC is available for reading, research, studying, doing homework, completing assignments and special programs. The mission of the Library Resource Center is to insure that students, faculty and staff become effective users of information available in all formats.

Attendance

  1. Students must scan their own current IDs when entering the LRC. Students do not have to scan when entering with their class for research. 
  2. Students remain in the LRC if it is 10 minutes or less before the end of a period.
  3. Freshmen may conduct research or group projects in the LRC during their study period.  All other work needs to be completed in their study.

Behavior

  1. Students please exhibit Warrior Pride behavior.
  2. Students please speak softly and on school related work. 
  3. Students please ensure the library is cleaned up and chairs and couches are put back as they were found at the end of each period.

Fines:  If your book is not returned/renewed after six weeks of being overdue, it will be marked as lost, and the cost of the book will be charged to your school account.

 Hours

  1.  6:45 am to 4:00 pm on regular school days and late arrival days.
  2. 6:45 am to 3:30 pm on exam days.

 Loan Periods: Students must have a current Maine West student ID to check out a book.

  1. Books – 10 school days.
  2. Reference – overnight.
  3.  Loan periods are altered as needed.
  4.  Lost materials will be paid at the current purchase price.

Passes: Students must have a pass to enter and leave the LRC after the bell has rung.

  1. CAFE STUDY students get a pass from the front entrance supervisor.
  2. FRESHMAN STUDY students must report to study hall first.  They then need to get a pass from their study hall supervisor once they have explained the reasons they need to use the LRC (see attendance for guidelines).
  3. Students do not need a pass:
  • before school
  • during passing
  • after school
  • if a student is a Gold Card senior, they need to present their Gold Card to the adult at the circulation desk when they scan in.

Seating:  the LRC is divided into two main sections, collaborative seating and silent study area.  

  1. Collaborative seating area is located in the front of the library.  It has a variety of couches, sofa chairs, coffee tables and four top tables for students to sit and collaborate on school work, study or read.
  2. Silent study area is located in the back of the library.  This area is both an instructional setting for classes and a silent study area.  Students seated in this area should only sit two-to-a-table and be working silently; no talking is permitted in this area.

Technology Use

  1. Students are to adhere to the District 207 Acceptable Use Policy“A user’s network privileges may be interrupted or suspended while a suspected violation is being investigated…Violators will also be subject to disciplinary measures, such as suspension from school or expulsion.”  Policy #6510.6
  2. Printers are for school work only.
  3. Cell phones are allowed, however, no phone calls or talking on a cell phone is permitted in the LRC.

OTHER IMPORTANT INFORMATION

Buses

The Maine Township High Schools are served by regular Pace buses (public transportation). Students can pick up a bus schedule at book sales, in the bookstore or online. It is the responsibility of the students to reach school via public transportation or on their own. Bus tickets may be purchased in the school bookstore. Students riding a Pace bus to or from school are subject to the discipline policy of the school while on the bus.

 IHSA Scholastic Standing 

  1. Students must pass twenty-five (25) credit hours of high school work per week. Generally, twenty-five (25) credit hours are the equivalent of five (5) .5 credit courses (2.5 full credits).
  2. Students must have passed and received credit toward graduation for twenty-five (25) credit hours of high school work for the entire previous semester to be eligible at all during the ensuing semester.  (Beginning with the second semester of the school term.)

Network/Internet Use 

Student access to the District 207 Network and Internet is allowed only if a student has completed and returned the Network/Internet Use Agreement form.

Messages to Students

Messages will be delivered to students only in an extreme emergency situation.  If you plan to drop off items at school, arrangements must be made between the family member and the student to pick up the item.  We are not equipped to send out notices advising students that such items are in the office to be picked up.  Books, sports equipment, musical instruments can be dropped off at Student Services only with the understanding that it is the student’s responsibility to come in on their own to pick them up.  For this reason, we do not allow parents, family, and friends to send flowers, balloon bouquets, etc. to students while at school.

Regulations Regarding Student Behavior At Athletic Events 

The general guideline for good student conduct at athletic events is as follows:  Any conduct on the part of students that would encourage retaliation by the spectators from the opposing school is to be avoided.

The specific regulations regarding good behavior at athletic events are as follows:

  1. No mobile signs or placards will be allowed.
  2. Mechanical noise makers are prohibited.
  3. No objects will be tossed about in the stands.
  4. Unsportsmanlike conduct, such as taunts or bragging, will not be permitted.
  5. Cheers will not be obscene, vulgar, or suggestive and will not be directed at any individual player, coach, spectator or referee.

Rules for School Dances

  1. Tickets should be purchased in advance; tickets sold at the door are more expensive.
  2. Guests of Maine West students must be registered by name when their tickets are purchased.
  3. All those attending must arrive no later than one hour after the dance begins.
  4. Once a person has left a dance, that person may not return.
  5. All school rules, including those related to alcohol and other drugs are in effect.

Severe Weather Conditions 

In the case of extreme cold, snow or heat or other severe weather conditions, school may be cancelled or the school day altered.  Information about the cancellation or alteration of the school day because of severe weather conditions will be provided to radio and television stations.  Notification about weather related school closings will be provided by the Internet service: www.weatherclosings.com and on Maine West’s website.

Important Test Dates

Important test dates can be found on the Student Services webpage by visiting https://west.maine207.org/ss-calendar/.

CO-CURRICULAR CLUBS AND ACTIVITIES

Maine Township District 207 schools offer extensive opportunities beyond the classroom to engage in learning, self-discovery and the pursuit of personal interests with like-minded peers.  Offering over 80 clubs and activities, students can participate in clubs based on hobbies, academics, charitable efforts, as well as social and political interests.  Explore our clubs by visiting our website at https://west.maine207.org/clubs-activities-student-organizations/.

ATHLETIC CONFERENCE

Central Suburban League

Deerfield Highland Park Niles West
Evanston Maine East Niles North
Glenbrook North Maine South New Trier
Glenbrook South Maine West Vernon Hills

MAINE WEST ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT

FALL SPORTS: Boys Cross Country, Girls Cross Country, Football, Boys Golf, Girls Golf, Boys Soccer, Girls Swimming and Diving, Girls Tennis and Girls Volleyball

WINTER SPORTS: Boys Basketball, Girls Basketball, Cheerleading, Competitive Dance/POMS, Fencing, Girls Gymnastics, Boys Swimming and Diving and Wrestling

SPRING SPORTS: Girls Badminton, Baseball, Girls Soccer, Girls Softball, Boys Tennis, Boys Track, Girls Track, Boys Volleyball, Boys Water Polo and Girls Water Polo


REQUIRED NOTIFICATIONS

SCHOOL BUS SAFETY RULES

bus

The Building Principal shall distribute the following rules to all students.  Those students not qualifying for school bus transportation to and from school should receive a copy because they may from time-to-time be transported to school activities by school bus.

  1. Dress properly for the weather.  Make sure all drawstrings, ties, straps, etc. on all clothing, backpacks and other items, are shortened or removed to lessen the likelihood of them getting caught in bus doors, railings or aisles.
  2. Arrive on time at the bus stop, and stay away from the street while waiting for the bus.
  3. Stay away from the bus until it stops completely and the driver signals you to board.  Enter in a single file without pushing.  Always use the handrail.
  4. Take a seat right away and remain seated facing forward.  Keep your hands, arms, and head inside the bus.
  5. Talk quietly on the bus. No shouting or creating loud noises that may distract the driver. Tablets, iPods®, iPads®, smart phones, and other electronic devices must be silenced on the bus unless a student uses headphones.
  6. Help keep the bus neat and clean.  Keep belongings out of the aisle and away from emergency exits.  Eating and drinking are not allowed on the bus.
  7. Always listen to the driver’s instructions.  Be courteous to the driver and other students.  Sit with your hands to yourself and avoid making noises that would distract the driver or bother other passengers.  Remain seated, keeping your hands, arms, and head inside the bus at all times.
  8. Wait until the bus pulls to a complete stop before standing up.  Use the handrail when exiting the bus.
  9. Stay out of the danger zone next to the bus where the driver may have difficulty seeing you.  Take five giant steps away from the bus and out of the danger zone, until you can see the driver and the driver sees you.  Never crawl under a bus.
  10. If you must cross the street after you get off the bus, wait for the driver’s signal and then cross in front of the bus.  Cross the street only after checking both ways for traffic.
  11. Never run back to the bus, even if you dropped or forgot something.

Additional resources:

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Traffic Safety Toolkit: one.nhtsa.gov/Driving-Safety/Community-Traffic-Safety/Community-Traffic-Safety-Toolkit

National Safety Council School Bus Safety Rules:  www.nsc.org/news_resources/Resources/Documents/School_Bus_Safety_Rules.pdf

Illinois State Police School Bus Safety: www.isp.state.il.us/docs/schoolbussafety5542.pdf

ISBE School Bus Safety What Parents Should Know: www.isbe.net/Documents/bus_safety_parents.pdf

ISBE Instructions To School Bus Riders (pg. 102): www.isbe.net/Documents/bus_ride_instruct.pdf

ILSOS Parent information flyer, games etc.: www.cyberdriveillinois.com/departments/drivers/traffic_safety/school_bus_safety/home.html

 

Offender Community Notification Laws

State law requires schools to notify parents/guardians during school registration or parent-teacher conferences that information about sex offenders and violent offenders against youth is available to the public on the Illinois State Police’s website. The Illinois State Police website contains the following:

Illinois Sex Offender Registry: www.isp.state.il.us/sor/

Illinois Murderer and Violent Offender Against Youth Registry: www.isp.state.il.us/cmvo/

Frequently Asked Questions Concerning Sex Offenders: www.isp.state.il.us/sor/faq.cfm

CPR and AED Video

State law requires the Illinois High School Association to post a hands-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation and automated external defibrillators training video on its website. The law also requires the District to notify staff members and parents/guardians about the video. You are encouraged to view the video, which will take less than 15 minutes of your time, at: www.ihsa.org/Resources/SportsMedicine/CPRTraining.aspx.

 

Targeted School Violence Prevention Program

Student safety is our District’s top priority. To maximize safety, the District must have a process to identify threats and prevent targeted school violence. This process is part of the Targeted School Violence Prevention Program (Program). The Program is a portion of the preparedness and response phases of the District’s Safety Plan for emergency operations plans and disaster management.

The District wishes to create a climate that encourages sharing any information about a safety concern with a trusted adult who can help. Sharing information about threats and safety concerns is everyone’s responsibility: students, parents, staff, and community members. The question and answer section below is designed to help students, staff and parents understand when school officials want individuals to share information about a safety concern with the Building Principal.

What Is a Threat?

A threat expresses intent to harm someone or something. It may be spoken, written, or expressed in another way.  Threats may be direct (“I’m going to beat you up” or “I’m going to blow this place up!”) or indirect (“Come and watch what I am going to do to him/her.”).  A threat can be vague (“I’m going to hurt him.”) or implied (“You better watch out.”).  Any possession of a weapon or mention of one is a possible threat.  Sometimes students make threats that may seem funny or “just kidding,” but sometimes a threat is very serious and/or criminal. When you are in doubt as to whether the statement is kidding or serious, the responsible thing to do is to tell a trusted adult who can help.

What Is Targeted School Violence?

Targeted School Violence includes school shootings and other school-based attacks where the school was deliberately selected as the location for the attack and was not simply a random site of opportunity. 

What Is the Connection Between Targeted School Violence and Bullying?

The Ill. State Board of Education’s School Bullying Prevention Taskforce report identifies bullying and targeted school violence as “part and parcel of the same issue: interpersonal aggression.” In all its forms, interpersonal aggression negatively impacts students, school personnel, and communities and should be reported, investigated, and responded to with appropriate interventions. 

What Can Staff and Parents Do?

Educate students about what a threat is, encourage students not to make threats or “just kidding” statements in the first place, and reiterate that seeking help to prevent someone from getting hurt or hurting another is appropriate

 

Behavioral Support Guidelines and Procedures & Extracurricular 

Code of Conduct

2020-2021

MAINE TOWNSHIP HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT 207

Updated: July 6, 2020

Statement of Purpose

Together we educate students to be informed, inquisitive, responsible, creative, and reasoning individuals.

The following goals represent the commitment of District 207 to develop all students according to their individual potential.

Goals

All students will read, write, speak, and listen effectively in English.

All students will recognize their responsibilities as members of a family, the school, the community, the nation, and the world.

All students will recognize their responsibilities as stewards of the environment.

All students will demonstrate an understanding of and be able to apply the important concepts in mathematics, language, social science, the natural and physical sciences, the fine and/or applied arts and will recognize their interconnections.

All students will demonstrate an understanding of the American heritage and other cultures of the world.

All students will develop the habits necessary to conduct research, engage in problem solving, and make informed decisions through analysis, synthesis, and evaluation.

All students will demonstrate cooperation, respect for themselves and others, commitment to quality performance, and will recognize the value of teamwork and leadership.

All students will demonstrate an understanding of the principles and applications of technology.

All students will develop the skills of self-direction which they will use to engage in life-long learning, prepare for one or more careers, and pursue physical and emotional well-being.

All students will have the opportunity to participate in a wide variety of co-curricular activities and interscholastic competitions.

Our Mission is to Improve Learning

 

Philosophy of School Discipline

Quality schools are active in their commitment to a philosophy of student discipline that is fair, consistent, and effective.  The purpose of these procedures is to promote the development of student citizenship and learning by maintaining a safe and educationally conducive environment for students, faculty and members of the community.  To cultivate such a discipline program in Maine, a committee of parents, students, teachers, administrators, and board members developed comprehensive discipline procedures in 1986 that established expectations for student behavior, as well as consequences for misbehavior.  District 207 Discipline Procedures are distributed in booklet form to students and their parents, teachers, department chairs/lead teachers, counselors, deans, and others, who then can function as a team to promote a wholesome, safe, and secure school climate.

While most students do exercise self-discipline and self-control, occasionally some students violate the rules.  Students, parents, and school personnel should take a few minutes to familiarize themselves with the regulations of this District 207 Discipline Procedures booklet.  Designed not only to inform and guide, written discipline procedures also promote the idea that students must take responsibility for their own behavior.  Effective discipline is possible only when students, parents, and school personnel know, understand, and support the school rules and regulations.  Correspondingly, they should also understand and support the consequences of misbehavior.  Only with effective discipline can students have the maximum opportunity to develop emotionally, socially, and intellectually.

Discipline Procedures was first published in 1986 in compliance with a provision of the Illinois Educational Reform Act of 1985 which required school districts to organize a parent/teacher advisory committee to develop a written policy on student discipline with the school board.  These procedures have been reviewed and updated annually, as needed or in response to changes in state law.  All students are expected to be familiar with the information contained in this booklet of discipline procedures.  

The policy is reviewed annually by a committee of administrators, students, teachers, and parents.  Parents, students, and faculty members who have concerns or recommendations regarding these policies or procedures should contact the Assistant Principal for Students for their respective school.  District 207 will notify students, student’s parents or legal guardian of any changes in these disciplinary procedures. 

It is the policy of District 207 not to discriminate on the basis of sex, sexual orientation, color, physical handicap, race, nationality, residence, age, religion, or religious affiliations. (Revise to new policy)

The Title IX and Section 504 coordinator is the Assistant Superintendent for General Administration, who may be contacted at (847) 692-8007.

Due Process

Maine Township High School District 207 will provide due process in all matters of significant student discipline, such as student suspensions and expulsions.  The nature of due process will vary with the severity of the violation and the proposed discipline.  However, the essential elements of due process are notice of the misconduct with which the student is charged and an opportunity for the student to respond.  Where appropriate and legally permissible, the District will strive to maintain the anonymity of student witnesses.

While implementing due process in District 207, the administrator authorized to suspend will confer with the student and will investigate the matter.  During this conference, the administrator will inform the student of the violation, state the reasons for the proposed disciplinary action and give the student the opportunity to respond.  If the administrator suspends the student, the administrator will make a reasonable attempt to notify the student’s parent or legal guardian by telephone and will send written notice to the student’s parent(s) or legal guardian.   

Out-of-School Suspensions

In cases where out-of-school suspension is enacted, the responsible administrator will provide written notice to the student’s parent(s) or legal guardian.  This notice will include:

  1. A statement of the reason for the suspension.
  2. Specific violations as described in the Discipline Procedures found on the district website.
  3. The inclusive dates of the suspension.
  4. A statement of the rationale for the length of the suspension.
  5. For suspensions of 1-3 days, the notice will include a determination that the student’s continued presence in school would pose a threat to school safety or a disruption to other students’ learning opportunities.
  6. For suspensions of 4 or more days, the notice will include (a) a description of other interventions attempted, (b) a determination that there are no other appropriate and available interventions, and (c) a determination that the student’s continued presence in school would either (i) pose a threat to the safety of other students, staff, or members of the school community or (ii) substantially disrupt, impede, or interfere with the operation of the school.
  7. For suspensions of 5 or more days, the notice will include a determination of any support services that will be available to the student during the suspension period.
  8. A statement indicating that a suspension will be limited to a maximum of five (5) school days by the Dean and may be extended to up to ten (10) school days by the Executive Committee.  Only the Board of Education can extend a suspension beyond ten (10) school days.
  9. A request for an appeal conference concerning a suspension shall be made, in writing, within five school days to the Assistant Principal for Students or Principal designee. This appeal conference, as well as any subsequent conference, may include an adult advocate.
  10. An explanation of the rights and procedures required for requesting a formal hearing before the Board of Education or its hearing officer, including the final date by which the hearing may be requested.

A request for a formal hearing concerning a suspension shall be made in writing within five school days after the initial date of suspension or the date of the assistant principal or principal conference.

The suspension will remain in effect pending the resolution of a conference/formal hearing.  If the conference/formal hearing determines that the suspension is inappropriate, the suspension will be reversed and the student will not be penalized for school days absent.

Students subject to out-of-school suspensions will have an opportunity to make-up work for equivalent academic credit.

Expulsion

The student or the student’s parent(s) or legal guardian may request a formal hearing when the student is being referred by the Principal to the Board of Education for expulsion from school.

When a student is referred by the Principal to the Board of Education for expulsion from school, the Principal will send written notice to the parents to include:

  1. The purpose of the formal hearing.
  2. A request that the student and student’s parent or legal guardian attend.
  3. The date, time, and place of the hearing; the student’s right to be represented, at the student’s own expense, by an advocate of the student’s own choice including legal counsel. 
  4. The student’s right to have evidence presented on the student’s behalf; the right to review the student’s personal school records; the right to present witnesses.
  5. The name and title of the hearing officer.

At its next regularly-scheduled meeting, the Board will review the information presented.  Immediately following the Board review, the Board will send written notice of its decision to the student’s parent(s) or legal guardian.  The Board notice will include:

  1. A statement of the reason for the expulsion.
  2. Specific violations as described in the Discipline Procedures found on the district website.
  3. The inclusive dates of the expulsion.
  4. A statement of the rationale for the length of the expulsion.
  5. A description of other interventions attempted.
  6. A determination that there are no other appropriate and available interventions.
  7. A determination that the student’s continued presence in school would either (i) pose a threat to the safety of other students, staff, or members of the school community or (ii) substantially disrupt, impede, or interfere with the operation of the school.
  8. The specific reasons why removing the student from the learning environment is in the best interest of the school.

Any suspension or expulsion from school includes all school activities and a prohibition from being present on school grounds or at school activities. 

Expectations of Student Behavior

Acceptable student behavior is an important part of a well-designed and effectively managed educational program. The information in Sections I and II establishes District 207 expectations for acceptable student behavior, outlines the alternatives for responding to violations and misbehavior, and establishes disciplinary consequences for improper student conduct.

Communication between school and home is essential to promoting good student behavior.  Oftentimes, faculty members will call a student’s parent(s) or legal guardian to discuss their expectations for student behavior.  Student’s parent(s) or legal guardian(s) are also encouraged to call teachers, counselors, and other school personnel.

Students are subject to suspension, expulsion or other discipline for misconduct as described in these Discipline Procedures that occurs: 

  1. a) during school time, b) on school grounds or at any school supervised or school sponsored activity, , c) during off-campus activities where the violation is reasonably related to school matters and d) in places adjacent to school grounds designated and publicized by the building principals as having a reasonable relationship to school matters.  Also, school officials may investigate and assign consequences for incidents occurring in other circumstances reasonably related to student health, safety, and opportunity to fully engage in school and school-sponsored activities, such as traveling to and from school and school-sponsored activities and participation in social networking websites (Facebook, email etc).  Consequences to these infractions may include, but are not limited to, loss of privileges, detentions, reassignment, suspension and/or expulsion.

Section I

General Expectations

Absenteeism

In District 207, we believe that attendance is important, and correlated with academic success. Any time a student misses time in class, whether it be for an authorized or unauthorized reason, he or she is missing valuable learning experiences that cannot be recreated. We also believe it is important for students to learn to demonstrate professional behaviors such as meeting obligations to be present and on time when expected. 

In addition, behaviors including attendance, are separate from academic skills, and thus should be addressed accordingly. School-based social privileges may be earned (or lost) based on attendance patterns. If it is determined that a student’s academic progress is negatively impacted by attendance patterns, additional interventions and/or consequences may occur. Often parents/guardians are required to be a part of intervention meetings and plans. School leadership teams maintain an ongoing list of options for interventions and consequences, including but not limited to the following:

  • Restriction of Option Areas
  • Reassignment of lunch designation
  • Removal of late arrival and/or early dismissal
  • Field Trips
  • Removal of other privileges such as parking permit, phone etc.
  • Attend School Sponsored Activities (dances, athletic events, etc.)
  • Participate in Extracurricular Activities (practices, rehearsals, competitions, performances, meetings, club events, etc.) 
  • Removal of Course from schedule with no credit

Under the Illinois School Code, absences may only be authorized for the following reasons:  

  1. Student illness
  2. Death in the immediate family 
  3. Observance of a religious holiday 
  4. Family emergency
  5. Situations beyond the control of the student as determined by the administration, such as hospitalization or serious illness, for which the school receives timely, acceptable documentation.
  6. Circumstances which cause reasonable concern to the parent for the mental, emotional, or physical health or safety of the students 

A parent/legal guardian is responsible for informing the school of their student’s absence within 24 hours. Voicemail/recording is available 24 hours per day.  Absences that are non-school related may require further documentation as reasonably requested and approved by the school.

Tardiness to Class:

Since teachers and students need to make full use of instructional time, students must report to class on time. Students are considered on time to class when they are in their assigned learning space by the assigned start time. 

Students who arrive at their designated learning space after the designated start time without a valid pass or other type of authorization will be admitted and marked as “Tardy” in the Student Information System.

Repeated tardiness to class may result in interventions and/or consequences. Often parents/guardians are required to  be a part of intervention meetings and plans. School leadership teams maintain an ongoing list of options for interventions and consequences, which is available upon request. 

Unauthorized Departure from School:

Students are expected to remain in school or on the school campus during the school day unless they have proper authorization. 

If a student is found to be in violation of this regulation the dean will confer with the student and determine appropriate consequences.

Consequences to these infractions may include, but are not limited to, loss of privileges, detentions, reassignment and suspension. Repeat violations or engagement in behavior that is inappropriate, unsafe, or in violation of additional school policies, may result in suspension and/or revocation of parking privileges without refund.

Disruptive Classroom Behavior:

Students are expected to respect teachers as well as the educational opportunities of themselves and fellow classmates. As such, students must comply with teachers’ instructional and classroom procedures.

Students learn best in an orderly classroom.  Students who are disruptive or insubordinate may be dismissed from the classroom by the teacher and sent to a department chair/dean for the remainder of the class period.  

When a student is removed from class, the teacher will make a reasonable attempt to contact the student’s parent(s) or legal guardian and refer the student to the department chair/ dean who will confer with the student and assign appropriate discipline.  The dean may place the student on probation for the remainder of the course.  A letter will be sent to the parent(s) or legal guardian informing them of the disciplinary action.  A student on probation first semester will remain on probation second semester in the same course/department.  

If the student continues to misbehave or disrupt the class, the teacher will make a reasonable attempt to contact the student’s parent(s) or legal guardian and refer the student to the dean.   The dean will confer with the student, assign appropriate discipline, and may refer this matter to the Executive Committee for further action. This action may include but not be limited to, removal from class, assignment of a failing grade, and reassignment to a supervised study area. If the student re-enrolls in the same course/department second semester, the student will re-enter on probationary status. 

Driving and Parking Violations:

Any student who drives a vehicle to school and parks on campus must register that vehicle with the school, pay the parking fee, and then have the sticker or placard displayed according to school policy, and park only in the designated space.  Drivers must drive safely and comply with driving regulations as prescribed by the Secretary of State in the booklet “Rules of the Road” as well as with local and school traffic regulations.  Eligibility for driving and parking at school is determined by the school administration and is related to the availability of parking spaces at the campus. Any vehicles in violation of the preceding parking regulations are subject to ticketing and/or towing at the owner’s expense and risk.  Violation of parking regulations or unsafe driving may lead to removal and revocation of parking stickers without refund of the sticker fee as well as denial of future parking privileges.  Vehicles in parking lots or on other school property are subject to search in accordance with the terms of Section 10-22.6 of the Illinois School Code.    

If a student is found to be in violation of driving or parking regulations the following will occur as a result of the first and subsequent violations:

1st Violation: The dean may have the car ticketed and/or towed without conferring with the student for a parking violation and the student will be responsible for the expense and risk of such action.  The dean will confer with the student and a letter will be sent by the dean to the student’s parent(s) or legal guardian informing them of the disciplinary action.  The dean may suspend the student’s driving privileges on campus and may place the student on driving probation on the school campus for the remainder of the school year. The dean may remove the student’s driving privileges on campus for the remainder of the current school year for a flagrant violation that threatens the safety and welfare of any individual. The dean may suspend the student for up to five school days and may refer the student to the Executive Committee and/or may refer the student to the police for further action depending on the severity of the violation.   

2nd and Subsequent Violations: The dean may tow any car without conferring with the student for a parking violation and the student will be responsible for the expense and risk of such action.  The dean will confer with the student and a letter will be sent by the dean to the student’s parent(s) or legal guardian informing them of the disciplinary action.  The dean will suspend the student’s driving privilege on campus for 30 calendar days and may place the student on driving probation on campus for the remainder of the semester or for the school year.  The dean may remove the student’s driving privileges on campus for the remainder of the school year for a flagrant or repeated violation that threatens the safety and welfare of any individual.  The dean may suspend the student for up to five school days and may refer the student to the Executive Committee and/or may refer the student to the police for further action depending on the severity of the violation.    

Cheating and Plagiarism:

Students are expected to complete all tests and assignments with academic integrity. Students will not collaborate on tests or other assignments unless directed to by the teacher.

If a student engaged in cheating or plagiarism, the following will occur as a result of the first and subsequent violations:

1st Violation: The student’s teacher will assign a 40% grade on the test or assignment and will make a reasonable attempt to call the student’s parent or legal guardian.  The teacher shall notify the counselor and may refer the student to the department chair. Upon referral the dean may place the student on probation in that class for the remainder of the course.  The dean may suspend the student and may refer the student to the Executive Committee depending on the severity of the infraction.  

If a student is placed on class probation, a letter will be sent by the dean to the student’s parent(s) or legal guardian informing them of the probation and/or suspension.  

2nd Violation: If a second violation occurs in the same class, the teacher will refer the matter to the dean. The dean will confer with the student. The dean may suspend the student and refer the matter to the Executive Committee for further action. Such action may include but not be limited to removal from the class, assignment of a failing grade, and reassignment to a supervised study area.  A letter will be sent by the dean to the student’s parent(s) or legal guardian informing them of the decision.   

Forgery/Altering Information:

Information submitted to the school shall be submitted honestly and without alteration.  This includes information on school forms and documents, as well as information submitted via telephone and other forms of electronic transfer.  Impersonating a parent, guardian, school official, or others will constitute a violation of this rule. 

The dean will confer with the student. Consequences to these infractions may include, but are not limited to, loss of privileges, detentions, reassignment, suspension and/or expulsion. The dean will make a reasonable attempt to contact and will send a letter to the student’s parent (s) or legal guardian informing them of the disciplinary action.  The dean may refer the matter to the Executive Committee.  The Executive Committee may extend the suspension to a maximum of ten school days and a student may be dropped from the class with a failing grade and be reassigned to a supervised study.  

Games of Chance:

Games of chance are prohibited. Gambling paraphernalia, including but not limited to such items as cards and dice, will be confiscated and delivered to the dean.

Students who engage in games of chance may be referred to the dean.  Upon referral, the dean will confer with the student and may assign detentions, reassignment, or suspensions.  Should the reassignment or suspension be necessary, the dean will send a letter to the student’s parent(s) or legal guardian informing them of the disciplinary action. In certain instances, the dean may refer the matter to the Executive Committee for further action and may also contact the police.

Identification (I.D.) Cards

The board requires Identification Cards for all students and staff.

IDENTIFICATION (I.D.) CARDS:  The student is expected to carry his/her current student I.D. card while at school or while attending a school related activity and is expected to present it to a staff member upon request.  

Refusal to present an I.D. as requested may be considered insubordination and may result in suspension.  In addition, no student shall possess a school I.D other than their own I.D for the current school year and shall not use any I.D. other than their own current school I.D. to gain access to any area of the school or perform any transaction in the cafeteria or elsewhere in the school. Upon review, the dean may assign detentions, reassignment, or suspend the student from school.  

Inappropriate Displays of Affection:

Students are expected to exercise restraint in displaying affection toward one another.  

When a staff member observes students who are not exercising restraint in displaying affection, the staff member will request the students to stop. Students are expected to abide by the request of the staff member. Failure to comply with a request may result in referral to the dean. Upon referral, the dean will confer with the students, may contact the student’s parents or legal guardians, and may initiate further disciplinary action.

Dress​ ​Code​ ​Philosophy

Maine Township High School District 207’s student dress code supports equitable educational access and is written in a manner that avoids reinforcing stereotypes. To ensure effective and equitable enforcement of this dress code, school staff shall enforce the dress code consistently and in a manner that does not reinforce or increase marginalization or oppression of any group based on race, sex, gender identity, gender expression, sexual orientation, ethnicity, religion, cultural observance, household income or body type/size.

What we value:

  • All students should be able to dress comfortably for school and engage in the educational environment without fear of or actual unnecessary discipline or body shaming.
  • All students and staff should understand that they are responsible for managing their own personal “distractions” without regulating individual students’ clothing/self expression.
  • Student dress code enforcement should not result in unnecessary barriers to school attendance.
  • School staff should be trained and able to use student/body-positive language to explain the code and to address code violations.
  • Teachers should focus on teaching without the additional and often uncomfortable burden of dress code enforcement.
  • Reasons for conflict and inconsistent and/or inequitable discipline should be minimized whenever possible. 

The goals we seek to accomplish through the implementation and enforcement of this dress code are to:

  • Maintain a safe learning environment in classes where protective or supportive clothing is needed.
  • Allow students to wear clothing of their choice that is comfortable.
  • Allow students to wear clothing that expresses their self-identified gender.
  • Allow students to wear religious attire without fear of discipline or discrimination.
  • Prevent students from wearing clothing or accessories with offensive images or language, including profanity, hate speech, and pornography.
  • Prevent students from wearing clothing or accessories that denote, suggest, display or reference alcohol, drugs or related paraphernalia or other illegal conduct or activities.
  • Prevent students from wearing clothing or accessories that will interfere with the operation of the school, disrupt the educational process, invade the rights of others, or create a reasonably foreseeable risk of such interference or invasion of rights.
  • Prevent students from wearing clothing or accessories that reasonably can be construed as being or including content that is racist, lewd, vulgar or obscene, or that reasonably can be construed as containing fighting words, speech that incites others to imminent lawless action, defamatory speech, or threats to others.
  • Ensure that all students are treated equitably regardless of race, sex, gender identity, gender expression, sexual orientation, ethnicity, religion, cultural observance, household income or body type/size.

School Dress​ ​Code

Maine Township High School District 207 expects that all students will dress in a way that is appropriate for the school day or for any school sponsored event. Student dress choices should respect the District’s intent to sustain a community that is inclusive of a diverse range of identities. The primary responsibility for a student’s attire resides with the student and their parent(s) or guardian(s). The school district is responsible for seeing that student attire does not interfere with the health or safety of any student, that student attire does not contribute to a hostile or intimidating atmosphere for any student, and that dress code enforcement does not reinforce or increase marginalization or oppression of any group based on race, sex, gender identity, gender expression, sexual orientation, ethnicity, religion, cultural observance, household income, or body type/size. Any restrictions to the way a student dresses must be necessary to support the overall educational goals of the school and must be explained within this dress code.

  • ​Basic​ ​Principle: ​ ​Certain​ ​body​ ​parts​ ​must​ ​be​ ​covered​ ​for​ ​all​ ​students​ ​at​ ​all​ ​times. 

Clothes must be worn in a way such that genitals, buttocks, breasts, and nipples are fully covered with opaque fabric. However, cleavage should not have coverage requirements. All items listed in the “must wear” and “may wear” categories below must meet this basic principle.

  • Students​ ​Must​ ​Wear*​, while following the basic principle of Section 1 above:
  • A​ ​Shirt​ (with fabric in the front, back, and on the sides under the arms), AND
  • Pants/jeans​ ​or​ ​the​ ​equivalent​ ​(for example, a skirt, sweatpants, leggings, a dress or shorts), AND
  • Shoes​.

*Courses that include attire as part of the curriculum (for example, professionalism, public speaking, and job readiness) or special school events including, but not limited to, performances, field trips, or graduation ceremonies may include assignment-specific dress, but should not focus on covering bodies in a particular way or promoting culturally-specific attire. Activity-specific shoe requirements are permitted (for example, athletic shoes for PE).

Students​ ​May​ ​Wear​, as long as these items do not violate Section 1 above:

  • Hats facing straight forward or straight backward. Hats must allow the face to be visible to staff, and not interfere with the line of sight of any student or staff.
  • Religious headwear
  • Hoodie sweatshirts (wearing the hood loosely overhead is allowed, but the face and ears must be visible to school staff when viewed from the front).
  • Fitted pants, including opaque leggings, yoga pants and “skinny jeans”
  • Pajamas
  • Ripped jeans, as long as underwear and buttocks are not exposed.
  • Tank tops, including spaghetti straps; halter tops
  • Athletic attire
  • Visible waistbands on undergarments or visible straps on undergarments worn under other clothing (as long as this is done in a way that does not violate Section 1 above).

Students​ ​Cannot​ ​Wear:

  • Violent language or images.
  • Images or language depicting drugs or alcohol (or any illegal item or activity).
  • Hate speech, profanity, pornography.
  • Images or language that creates a hostile or intimidating environment based on any protected class or consistently marginalized groups.
  • Any clothing that reveals visible undergarments (visible waistbands and visible straps are allowed).
  • Swimsuits (except as required in class or athletic practice).
  • Accessories that could be considered dangerous or could be used as a weapon.
  • Any item that obscures the face or ears with the following exception:
    • personal protection equipment (masks, shields) during a pandemic
    • or items worn as a religious observance.

Dress​ ​Code​ ​Enforcement

To ensure effective and equitable enforcement of this dress code, school staff shall enforce the dress code consistently using the requirements below. School administration and staff shall not have discretion to vary the requirements in ways that lead to discriminatory enforcement.

  • Students will only be removed from spaces, hallways, or classrooms as a result of a dress code violation as outlined in Sections 1 and 4 above. Students in violation of Section 1 and/or 4 will be provided three (3) options to be dressed more to code during the school day:
    • Students will be asked to put on their own alternative clothing, if already available at school, to be dressed more to code for the remainder of the day.
    • Students will be provided with temporary school clothing to be dressed more to code for the remainder of the day.
    • If necessary, students’ parents may be called during the school day to bring alternative clothing for the student to wear for the remainder of the day.
  • No student should be affected by dress code enforcement because of racial identity, sex assigned at birth, gender identity or expression, sexual orientation, ethnicity, cultural or religious identity, household income, body size/type, or body maturity.
  • School staff shall not enforce the school’s dress code more strictly against transgender and gender nonconforming students than other students.
  • Students should not be shamed or required to display their body in front of others (students, parents, or staff) in school. “Shaming” includes, but is not limited to:
    • kneeling or bending over to check attire fit;
    • measuring straps or skirt length;
    • asking students to account for their attire in the classroom or in hallways in front of others;
    • calling out students in spaces, in hallways, or in classrooms about perceived dress code violations in front of others; in particular, directing students to correct sagged pants that do not expose the entire undergarment, or confronting students about visible bra straps, since visible waistbands and straps on undergarments are permitted; and,
    • accusing students of “distracting” other students with their clothing.

These dress code guidelines shall apply to regular school days and summer school days, as well as any school-related events and activities, such as graduation ceremonies, dances, and prom. Students who feel they have been subject to discriminatory enforcement of the dress code should contact the Assistant Principal for Students. 

Insubordination:

Students must respect the authority of staff members. Insubordination usually is manifested by blatant disobedience, outright refusal to respond to a direction or directive, or refusal to respond to reasonable requests by staff members including requests for conferences with counselors, deans, or department chairs.  When a student is insubordinate, the teacher may assign the student detentions.  

Any staff member may refer an insubordinate student to the dean who will confer with the student.  Consequences to these infractions may include, but are not limited to, loss of privileges, detentions, reassignment, suspension and/or expulsion.

Misconduct– General:

Students are expected to engage in proper behavior at school and school-sponsored activities. Behavior that is antisocial, disrespectful, illegal, – general wrongdoing- with the potential to disrupt the educational environment or may be dangerous to other students, faculty, or staff is prohibited.

Consequences to these infractions may include, but are not limited to, loss of privileges, detentions, reassignment, suspension and/or expulsion.

Misconduct–in Common Areas: 

Students are expected to behave in an appropriate manner in common areas of the school. Common areas include but are not limited to, the cafeteria, hallways, study halls, resource areas, restrooms, locker rooms, parking lots, etc. Students are responsible for cleaning up after themselves.

Consequences to these infractions may include, but are not limited to, loss of privileges, detentions, reassignment, suspension and/or expulsion. 

Misconduct on Buses:

Whenever students ride buses to and from school or to and from school-sponsored activities, they are participating in an “extended school day.”  Therefore, while riding these buses, students must comply with the rules of the school and bus company.   The “Misconduct-General” rules as stated above apply.

Consequences to these infractions may include, but are not limited to, loss of privileges, detentions, reassignment, suspension and/or expulsion.

Presence in Unauthorized Areas:

Students are not permitted in unauthorized areas at any time.  Unauthorized areas include any portions of the school building or grounds that are not intended for student presence, use, or designated on their class schedule for that period of the day. These unauthorized areas include, but are not limited to, areas that are unsupervised, unsafe, potentially dangerous or otherwise posted, communicated, or designated by the school administration.

Consequences to these infractions may include, but are not limited to, loss of privileges, detentions, reassignment, suspension and/or expulsion.

Use of Profanity, Obscene and/or Indecent Gestures, and Possession or 

Use of Pornographic Material:

Students are expected to use appropriate language and to conduct themselves appropriately for the school environment. Vulgar words, expressions, gestures, and/or possession of pornographic material which violate the standards of the school and community will not be tolerated in any form – written, spoken, or electronic.

When incidents occur, staff members will address students regarding the use of inappropriate language, gestures, or expressions. In cases of repeated offenses or flagrant violations, the student will be referred by the staff member to the dean.  When a student is in possession of pornographic material, the staff member will make a prompt referral to the dean.  Consequences to these infractions may include, but are not limited to, loss of privileges, detentions, reassignment, suspension and/or expulsion. 

Use of Electronic Devices

The use of such devices during the school day is prohibited, except as approved by school personnel in specific situations. Electronic devices may include but are not limited to I-Pods, netbooks, electronic tablets, etc.

The school assumes no responsibility for electronic devices brought to school.  

If a student does bring an electronic device to school, it should be turned off and secured when not being used in an authorized manner.

When a violation occurs, the dean will confer with the student.  Consequences to these infractions may include, but are not limited to, loss of privileges, detentions, reassignment, suspension and/or expulsion. 

The use of cellular telephones is allowed at designated times and in designated places approved by school personnel. The possession of electronic sending devices which include, but are not limited to, remote controls, and laser light projecting devices is prohibited.

As outlined in board policy 6512 Mobile Electronic Devices, using a cellular telephone or any other mobile electronic computing device in any manner that disrupts the educational environment or violates the rights of others, including using the device for taking photographs in locker rooms or bathrooms, cheating, unlawful purposes, bullying, harassment, or otherwise violating staff or student conduct rules, is prohibited. Prohibited conduct also specifically includes creating, sending, sharing, viewing, receiving, or possessing indecent images of oneself or another person through the use of an electronic computing device. Students are prohibited from using a cellular telephone, video recording device, personal digital assistant (PDA), or other electronic device to take or transmit digital photographic images, pictures, or movies of an individual or individuals without their consent during school, anywhere on school grounds, during a school related activity or at any other time or place where student conduct is subject to school discipline. Any use of a mobile computing device on school grounds during or after the school day that disrupts the educational process, goals of the institution, or violates the acceptable use policy is prohibited. All mobile computing devices brought on to school grounds are done so at the user’s own risk and District 207 is not responsible for any loss or damage of a personal device.

Except for in areas designated by the Building Principal, all electronic devices must be kept silenced and out-of-sight and stored in a locker, backpack, purse, pocket, or other place where it is not visible during the regular school day. Students and guests must comply with staff directives, including but not limited to, ending phone conversations for face-to-face interaction, using appropriate voice volume, and appropriate device volume.

Violations of board policy 6512 may result in confiscation of the equipment by any school employee who will then turn the equipment over to the designated building administrator(s) as soon as possible. Arrangements must be made by the student’s parent(s) or legal guardian to retrieve the equipment from the appropriate building administrator. The student may be suspended for up to five school days and the matter may be referred to the Executive Committee. The Executive Committee may extend the suspension to a maximum of ten school days and may refer the student to the Superintendent of Schools who may refer the student to the Board of Education for expulsion from school. 

When a violation occurs, the equipment may be confiscated by any school employee who will then turn the equipment over to the dean as soon as possible.  Arrangements must be made by the student’s parent(s) or legal guardian to retrieve the equipment from the dean.  Consequences to these infractions may include, but are not limited to, loss of privileges, detentions, REA, suspension and/or expulsion.

Misuse of Computers, Computer Software, or School Networks:

All students who use district owned computers and/or computer related connections, equipment and/or software must comply with the rules and regulations set forth in the Acceptable Use Policy and other relevant agreements.

These agreements include such items as copying software, which is prohibited.  In addition, only authorized codes, programs and files shall be used.  Students must maintain proper care when using the computer and/or computer software.

When a violation occurs, the dean will confer with the student. Consequences to these infractions may include, but are not limited to, loss of privileges, detentions, REA, suspension and/or expulsion.

The student will be held responsible for the cost of replacing or repairing the damage to the computers or the system that is caused by the student’s failure to comply with the Acceptable Use Agreement and other relevant agreements.

Section II

Student Behaviors and the Safety and Security of the School

The following student misbehaviors or evidence of a clear intent to participate in these misbehaviors are among the most serious that occur in schools.  Accordingly, they will be dealt with severely and may be referred to the Executive Committee and the Superintendent for possible expulsion by the Board of Education; the incident may also be referred to the police, and/or Extracurricular Code consequences as defined in Section 3 may also be applied.   Repeated violations of the general expectations stated in Section I may also be dealt with similarly.  

Assault, Battery, or Reckless Behavior:

Verbal or physical aggression or reckless behavior with the potential to put any individual at risk or fear of injury is prohibited.

If a staff member finds a student to be in violation of this regulation, the matter will be referred to the dean. Consequences to these infractions may include, but are not limited to, loss of privileges, detentions reassignment, suspension and/or expulsion. 

Policy for Illegal Substances

Students are expected to remain free of drugs, alcohol, tobacco and all illegal substances. If a student possesses, consumes, emits the odor of, participates in the distribution of or is under the influence of alcohol, drugs, tobacco products, “look alike” substances, marijuana, or any other substance not used as prescribed, or any other illegal substance, the student is in violation of this policy.  Also, if any such substance is used by a student to achieve a high or an altered mental state, or if a student is in possession of drug-related paraphernalia, the student is in violation of this policy. 

  • Sale and or Distribution:

Any student involved in the sale or distribution of an illegal substance will be reported to the local police.  Consequences to these infractions may include, but are not limited to, reassignment, suspension and/or expulsion.  The student may be preliminarily suspended until the next Executive Committee meeting.  If an incident is referred for consideration by the Executive Committee, then the Superintendent may issue additional discipline consequences including a referral to the Board of Education for expulsion from school. 

Possession/Under the Influence/Consumption:

Any student found to be in possession of such items as but not limited to pipes, rolling papers, quick hitters, and other drug paraphernalia /or an illegal substance used to achieve a high or altered mental state or not used as prescribed, may be reported to the local police and may be immediately suspended until the next Executive Committee meeting. The Executive Committee may recommend that the student be suspended for up to ten (10) school days.  For a first offense, the student may be offered an opportunity to enroll in a school approved drug/alcohol intervention program, at the parents’ or legal guardian’s expense in order to reduce the discipline consequence. Once enrolled, failure to participate in and complete the program as agreed will result in the issuance of additional disciplinary consequences.  Any further violation of either Part A or B of this policy may result in a suspension.  The student will also be referred to the Executive Committee, which may refer the student to the Superintendent, who may in turn refer the student to the Board of Education for expulsion from school.  

Possession or use of Tobacco:

Possession, use or distribution of any smoking device, tobacco, vaping, or over-the-counter nicotine replacement products, including but not limited to; electronic cigarettes and nicotine-containing skin patches, chewing gum and lozenges are prohibited. 

Any student found in possession, distributing, or using any smoking device, tobacco, vaping, or nicotine product will be referred to the dean for disciplinary action.  Consequences to these infractions may include, but are not limited to, loss of privileges, detentions, reassignment, suspension and/or expulsion. The dean will confer with the student, and send a letter to the student’s parent(s) or legal guardian informing them of the disciplinary action for a violation of this policy.  

Chronic Disobedience:

The repeated violation of school rules and regulations is prohibited.

If a student repeatedly violates school rules and regulations, the dean will confer with the student. Consequences to these infractions may include, but are not limited to, loss of privileges, detentions, REA, suspension and/or expulsion. 

The dean will make a reasonable attempt to contact the student’s parent(s) or legal guardian informing them of the disciplinary action.  

Extortion:

The use of force, threats or other intimidating behavior, attempts to take food, money, or other items from another person or cause the student to take action or avoid action against the student’s will is prohibited.

If a student violates this regulation, the dean will confer with the student.  Consequences to these infractions may include, but are not limited to, loss of privileges, detentions, reassignment, suspension and/or expulsion.

The dean will make a reasonable attempt to contact and will send a letter to the student’s parent(s) or legal guardian informing them of the disciplinary action.  

Fighting:

Pushing, shoving, fighting, or other physical confrontations are prohibited. Any violation of this policy may be reported to the police and may result in an arrest.  

If the student violates this regulation, the dean will confer with the student.  Consequences to these infractions may include, but are not limited to, loss of privileges, detentions, reassignment, suspension and/or expulsion.

The dean will make a reasonable attempt to contact the student’s parent(s) or legal guardian informing them of the disciplinary action

Gang and/or Secret Organization Affiliation:

A gang is defined as any ongoing organization, association or group of three (3) or more persons whether formal or informal, having as one of its primary activities the commission of one or more criminal acts or acts in violation of school rules, that may have an identifiable name or identifying sign or symbol, and whose members individually or collectively engage in or have engaged in a pattern of criminal activity or activity relating to the violation of school rules.  

Involvement with gang-related activities and/or secret organizations is prohibited.  The use or possession of symbols, that include, but are not limited to drawings, hand signs, hats, attire, and representation related to gang activities is prohibited.  In addition, threats involving stated or implied gang activity are likewise prohibited. Persons who join in or solicit others to join in any type of a secret society which includes gangs, will be suspended or expelled in accordance with the Illinois School Code, Article 31-3.

If a student is found to be involved in the activities prohibited above, the dean will confer with the student and may suspend the student until the next Executive Committee meeting.  The dean will also inform the principal.  The dean will make a reasonable attempt to contact and will send a letter to the student’s parent(s) or legal guardian informing them of the suspension.   The dean may refer the matter to the Executive Committee.  The Executive Committee may extend the suspension to a maximum of ten school days, report the student to the police, and may refer the student to the Superintendent of Schools who may refer the student to the Board of Education for expulsion from school.

Bullying (including Cyber Bullying), Intimidating, Hazing and/or Harassing of 

Staff Members and/or Students  

Bullying, intimidating, hazing and/or harassing of staff members or students is prohibited.  Such behavior includes but is not limited to the following – using force, threats, gestures, provocation, dress, demeanor, clustering, blocking, comments, or other means – is prohibited.  Harassment related to a person’s gender, sexual orientation, color, disabling condition, race, marital status, religious affiliation, national origin, or ethnic background is prohibited.  

If the student violates this regulation, the dean will confer with the student.  Consequences to these infractions may include, but are not limited to, loss of privileges, detentions, reassignment, suspension and/or expulsion.  The deans will contact the student’s parent(s) or legal guardian informing them of the disciplinary action.

Major School Disruption:

Major school disruptions are prohibited. A major school disruption involves intent to participate in or engaging in any activity which substantially or materially disrupts or could disrupt the school operation and/or endangers the health, safety, or security of others.  Examples of major school disruptions include but are not limited to falsely setting off a fire alarm, making a bomb threat, misuse of the emergency 911 telephone number, fights involving multiple parties or resulting in significant injury, or the initiation or propagation of a rumor or other misinformation that may lead to a material disruption of the educational process. 

If a student violates this regulation, the dean will confer with the student, and may suspend the student for up to five school days. The dean will make a reasonable attempt to contact and send a letter to the student’s parent(s) or legal guardian informing them of a suspension.  The dean may refer the matter to the Executive Committee for further action.  The Executive Committee may extend the suspension to a maximum of ten school days, report the student to the police, and may refer the student to the Superintendent of Schools who may refer the student to the Board of Education for expulsion from school.

Theft:

Theft is prohibited. Theft is defined as stealing or possessing property belonging to others without permission.  Students who find property of others are responsible for immediately turning the items over to a faculty or staff member.  Students facilitating theft by acts such as, but not limited to, providing a lock combination, distracting a victim, or keeping watch while another performs the theft will also be found in violation of this policy.

If the student violates this regulation, the dean will confer with the student. Consequences to these infractions may include, but are not limited to, loss of privileges, detentions, reassignment, suspension and/or expulsion.

The dean will make a reasonable attempt to contact the student’s parent(s) or legal guardian informing them of the disciplinary action.  The student and student’s parent(s) or legal guardian shall be responsible for restitution.

Vandalism:

Students must respect the property of others.  Defacing, damaging, or disrupting the appropriate use of school property or the personal property of others is prohibited.  Acts of vandalism directed toward a staff member, on or off campus, will still be subject to school discipline.  

If a student violates this regulation, the dean will confer with the student.  Consequences to these infractions may include, but are not limited to, loss of privileges, detentions, reassignment, suspension and/or expulsion.

The dean will make a reasonable attempt to contact the student’s parent(s) or legal guardian informing them of the disciplinary action. The student and student’s parent(s) or legal guardian shall be responsible for payment and/or restitution.

Possession or Use of Weapons or Explosives:

The possession, use, or distribution of weapons or “look-alikes” such as but not limited to firearms, knives, or explosives is prohibited.  The minimum discipline of the student who violates this rule will be expulsion for one year subject to modification by the Board of Education or the Superintendent on a case-by-case basis.  

If a student violates this regulation, the dean will confer with the student and may suspend the student for up to five school days.  The dean will make a reasonable attempt to contact and will send a letter to the student’s parent(s) or legal guardian informing them of a suspension.  The dean will refer the matter to the Executive Committee.  The Executive Committee may extend a suspension to a maximum of ten (10) school days and refer the student to the Superintendent of Schools who may refer the student to the Board of Education for expulsion from school.  In accordance with the Federal Gun-Free Schools Act of 1994 and the related provisions of the Illinois School Code, the minimum discipline for a student who violates this rule with respect to weapons will be expulsion for one calendar year, subject to modification by the Superintendent or the Board of Education on a case-by-case basis.  The administration may detain and remand the student to the police.  The school administration will confiscate all such items and deliver them to the police.

Possession, Use, Formulation or Distribution of Items Such as, But Not Limited to: Fireworks, Lighters, Matches, and Other Combustible, Flammable, Volatile or Explosive Substances is prohibited.

If a student violates this regulation, the dean will confer with the student and may suspend the student for up to five school days.  The dean will make a reasonable attempt to contact and will send a letter to the student’s parent(s) or legal guardian informing them of the disciplinary action.  The dean may refer the matter to the Executive Committee.  The Executive Committee may extend a suspension to a maximum of ten school days, report the student to the police, and may refer the student to the Superintendent of Schools who may refer the student to the Board of Education for expulsion from school.  The school administration will confiscate all such items and deliver them to the police.

Searches

Students and their personal effects are subject to search whenever school authorities have a reasonable suspicion that the search will produce evidence that the student has violated a school policy or the law.  Other property and areas are subject to search in accordance with the Illinois School Code.

The Illinois School Code (10-22.6) provides as follows:

To maintain order and security in the schools, school authorities may inspect and search places and areas such as lockers, desks, parking lots, and other school property and equipment owned or controlled by the school, as well as personal effects left in those places and areas by students, without notice to or the consent of the students, and without a search warrant.  As a matter of public policy, students have no reasonable expectation of privacy in these places or areas or in their personal effects left in these places and area.  School authorities may request the assistance of law enforcement officials for the purpose of conducting inspections and searches of lockers, desks, parking lots, and other school property and equipment owned or controlled by the school for illegal drugs, weapons or other illegal or dangerous substances or materials including searches conducted through the use of specially trained dogs.  If a search conducted in accordance with this section produces evidence that the student has violated or is violating either the law, local ordinance, or the school’s discipline policies or rules, such evidence may be seized by school authorities, and disciplinary action may be taken.  School authorities may also turn over such evidence to law enforcement authorities.”

Vehicles in parking lots or on other school property are subject to search in accordance with the terms of Section 10-22.6 of the Illinois School Code quoted above.    

Hand-held scanners may be used on any person on school grounds who is subject to a search under these Discipline Procedures or Illinois law.  The hand-held scanner may be used on any item left unsecured in and around the building.  Only the Principal, Assistant Principals, and Deans may authorize use of the hand-held scanner.  Only the Principal, Assistant Principals, Deans, school security officers and the School Resource Officer can use the hand-held scanner.  

The school district and school personnel will not conduct or authorize strip searches.

MAINE TOWNSHIP HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT 207

CANINE SEARCH PROTOCOL 

The planning and implementation of all canine searches will be the responsibility of the Building Level Search Committee. Members of this committee will be assigned and supervised by the building Principal.  Individuals serving on this committee may include the School Resource Officer, members of the Executive Committee and other district personnel approved by the Superintendent to serve on the committee.  This committee, working in consultation with the Superintendent, will determine the frequency and scope of all searches.  Each Building Level Search Committee will be responsible for reviewing the procedures, as outlined in the protocol, prior to initiating a canine search on school grounds.  The building Principal will determine the date and time of a search, which may include searches conducted after school hours when no students are present.

  1. The Principal will convene the Building Level Search Committee to initiate the canine search.  He/she is responsible for declaring and securing the search area(s). 
  2. For canine searches conducted during regular school hours, the bell system will be turned off and students will remain secured in their classrooms while continuing to be engaged in the instructional process. Classroom instructors will ensure students are not allowed to exit the classrooms or enter the hallways during the search.  The scope of the canine searches will be limited to school grounds. No canines will have direct contact with students for the purpose of conducting a search for illegal substances.  It is expected that all canine searches would be completed within one class period to avoid disruption to the educational process.  
  3. The Search Committee, along with safety monitors, security guards and specific administrators will monitor all areas of the building to maintain clear hallways and ensure that all students are in a supervised/secured area.
  4. ALL TEACHING STAFF will do the following to assist in commencing a canine search:
  • Remain outside their classroom until students arrive and the halls are clear.
  • Take attendance once the search is initiated and the search area(s) is secured.  
  • Maintain order in the classrooms during the search and prevent students from leaving the secured classrooms until the search has been completed.
  1.  ALL NON-TEACHING STAFF will monitor the hallways and escort visitors to the appropriate site to sign in and attend to their business.
  2.  ALL BUILDING LEVEL SEARCH COMMITTEE MEMBERS including all police officers/handlers and their canines will report to a designated entrance for staging and to receive final instructions.  Each search team will consist of a police officer/handler, a school administrator and a canine.  Each search team will be responsible for searching a specific area of the school grounds. 
  3.   If a canine alert, indicating the scent of an illegal substance on school grounds, a school administrator will conduct a search for contraband.  
  4.   If contraband is found, the parents of the student believed to be in possession of the contraband will be contacted and all District 207 policies and procedures related to an alleged violation of the illegal substances policy would be followed.  If contraband is not found, the parents will be informed of the actions that occurred during the search and subsequent alert.
  5.   Once the canine search has been completed, the Principal will announce the “all clear” signal and the bell system will resume as regularly scheduled.

(Approved: July 10, 2006)

Electronic Surveillance

The passive use of electronic surveillance is primarily for the purpose of assisting in maintaining a safe and orderly educational environment for students and staff and the protection of school property.  All persons present on District 207 property are subject to video surveillance.

Video Surveillance Notification

Notice of surveillance will be posted on those school building exterior doors in the vicinity of the area under surveillance. All persons present on District 207 property are subject to video surveillance.

Use of Video Surveillance Equipment

Video surveillance may be used to monitor the behavior and conduct of any person present on District property at any time to promote a safe school environment and protection of District property.

The use of surveillance equipment does not replace the authority and responsibility of District employees for assisting in the maintenance of a safe and secure educational environment

Surveillance equipment will be used to monitor campus activity and such recordings may be used as evidence in student disciplinary investigations, due process hearings, criminal or civil cases, or otherwise to enforce Board policy or the law.

Appropriate disciplinary action may be taken for misconduct that is captured via a video surveillance recording up to and including suspension and expulsion for students and suspension without pay and dismissal for employees.

All images of students recorded by the surveillance equipment are subject to the confidentiality accorded student records under applicable laws, Board policy, and administrative regulations.

Prohibited Conduct

All persons are prohibited from tampering with or causing damage to the video surveillance cameras, recording equipment or recordings.  Persons who violate this regulation shall receive a consequence in accordance with the District 207 Discipline Procedures, or other District policies that may include any or all of the following:  arrest, suspension or expulsion and may be required to make restitution for any property damage.

Glossary of Terms

Assault–A threat to do physical harm or constrain a person or do damage to a person or property.

Battery–Any physical harm or constraint to a person or damage to property.

Bullying–The term “bullying” encompasses behaviors including, but not limited to, any aggressive or negative gesture, or written, verbal, or physical act that places another student in reasonable fear of harm to his or her person or property, or that has the effect of insulting or demeaning any student in such a way as to disrupt or interfere with the school’s educational mission, or the education of any student.  Bullying most often will occur when a student asserts physical or psychological power over, or is cruel to, another student perceived to be weaker.  Such behavior may include but is not limited to:  pushing, hitting, threatening, name-calling or other physical or verbal conduct of a belittling or browbeating nature.  

Chronic–Frequent recurrence.

Detention–A period of extra attendance time which usually is served before school, after the student’s school day, or after school.  A teacher or a dean may assign the detention.  

Disobedience–Refusing or neglecting to obey school rules and regulations or directives and directions from staff members.

Drug/Alcohol Abuse Intervention Program–A drug/alcohol abuse intervention progra of counseling with students and student’s parent(s) or legal guardian that may be used in combination with a 5-day out-of-school suspension.  Failure to enroll in, participate in, or successfully complete the intervention program will result in a 10-day out-of-school suspension.  This program may be used as an alternative only once during the student’s high school years.  A student’s parent or legal guardian may voluntarily enroll their child in a school approved drug/alcohol intervention program.  Payment of costs associated with any chosen intervention program will be the responsibility of the parent(s) or legal guardian.

Executive Committee–A committee at East, South, and West chaired by the building principal and consisting of assistant principals, deans, and the director of student personnel services.  One of its functions is to determine consequences for serious violations of school rules.  

Expulsion–Action by the Board of Education to remove a student from school and all school related activities for a period not to exceed two calendar years.

Extortion–By using force, threats or other intimidating behavior, a student attempts to take money, food, or other items from another or cause the student to take action or avoid action against the student’s will.

Extracurricular Activities–School-related activities outside the classroom including, but not limited to, athletics, clubs, and dances.

Forgery—Includes (1) altering school forms or (2) using a false signature on any school form or document submitted to the school, or (3) misrepresenting identity or providing other false information by telephone, facsimile, or other electronic means.

Gang–Any ongoing organization, association or group of three (3) or more persons, whether formal or informal, having as one of its primary activities the commission of one or more criminal acts or acts in violation of school rules, which may have an identifiable name or identifying sign or symbol, and whose members individually or collectively engage in or have engaged in a pattern of criminal gang activity or activity relating to the violation of school rules.  

Harassing–Tormenting another person by repeated or severe threats or actions.

Hazing–Initiating or disciplining fellow students by means of horseplay, practical jokes, or tricks; to harass by banter, ridicule, or criticism; to play abusive and/or humiliating tricks.

Illegal Substance–The term “illegal substance” includes:  

– all alcoholic liquor (including those substances as defined in 235 ILCS 5/1-3.05),

– all controlled substances (including those substances as defined in 720 ILCS 570/100-603) except when prescribed for the student by a licensed physician,

– cannabis (including those substances as defined in 720 ILCS 550/1-19),

– any “look-alike” substance (including those substances as defined in 720 ILCS 570/102),

– any drug paraphernalia such as but not limited to pipes, one- hitters, rolling papers etc., and other drug paraphernalia (including those substances as defined in 720 ILCS 600/2), or any device which contains residue of an illegal substance, 

– any anabolic steroid (including those substances as defined in 720 ILCS 570/102), and

– tobacco (including those substances as noted in 105 ILCS 5/10-20.5b and defined in 105 ILCS  5/34-18.11).

– any substance used to achieve an altered mental state or a “high”.

Insubordination–Disobedience to constituted authority; refusal to obey a directive from a teacher or staff member; unwillingness to respect authority.

Lead Teacher–A department member designated by the building principal to assume certain duties in the absence of the department chair.

Look-alike–any substance or item which is not, but reasonably appears to be, or is represented to be, the real substance or item.  Examples include:  

  1. a toy gun which is very difficult to distinguish, except upon close examination, from an actual gun,
  2. a green leafy plant material which is not, but is claimed, believed or intended to appear to be marijuana,
  3. a white powdered substance which is not, but is claimed, believed or intended to appear to be a toxic chemical or biological agent.

Misconduct–Violation of rules; wrongdoing or improper behavior; a transgression of an established and definite rule.

Off-limits Areas–Areas at or within each building where students are not permitted at any time.  Such areas may include but are not limited to:  boiler rooms, electrical vaults, storage areas, restrooms/locker rooms designated for the opposite gender, faculty parking areas, cafeteria preparation areas, etc.

Plagiarism–To use the words or ideas of another person as if they were your own words or ideas. To steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one’s own. The use of (another’s production) without crediting the source. To commit literary theft or to present as new and original ideas or product derived from an existing source.

Possession–Any knowledge of, and any control over, an item.  Control includes, but is not limited to, having access to an item in a school locker, personal effects, a vehicle, or other place where the item is located.  It is not necessary that a student intend to control the item.  A student may acquire knowledge of an item visually, by being told about the item, or through other sensory perception.  A student’s knowledge will be determined based on the surrounding circumstances, not just the student’s statements.  For example, “forgetting” that an item is in one’s locker, personal effects, or vehicle may not constitute lack of knowledge.  Also, for example, coming onto school grounds or to a school-sponsored event in a vehicle which the student knows contains an item may constitute possession of that item, even if the vehicle or the item is not the student’s.  This provision on possession applies to any policy or rule which regulates or prohibits possession of any item, such as weapons or drug paraphernalia, and such substances as tobacco, alcohol, drugs and look-alikes of such items or substances. 

Probation–A period of time when a student’s behavior is closely monitored and evaluated by the teacher, counselor, and administration.  

Profanity and Obscenity–Irreverence or contempt; to engage in wrong or vulgar speech or actions; repulsive.

Reassignment Area–A supervised room for students who have been dismissed from the regular classroom or assigned elsewhere for disciplinary reasons.  Students may have the option of serving a Saturday REA in lieu of a weekday reassignment.  

Review Board–A committee at East, South, and West chaired by the assistant principal for students which determines consequences for serious violations of school rules during extracurricular activities.  The committee includes the coach or sponsor who directly supervises the student in the activity affected and the department chair or athletic director responsible for the activity affected.  The head coach or sponsor of the activity affected may be asked to serve on the committee at the option of the Review Board Chair.

Stealing–To take or knowingly possess the property of another without permission.

Suspension–Temporary removal of a student from school and all school activities for up to ten school days depending on the seriousness of the student’s misbehavior.  The deans, assistant principals, principals, and the Superintendent may suspend.  A student who is suspended shall not be on campus or at any school district activity on weekends and/or holidays while on suspension.

Tardy–Being late to class or school.

Terrorist-type Activities–Any act, threat, hoax or prank of a terrorist nature, especially involving weapons, explosives, biological agents, or dangerous materials or look-alikes of any such items. 

Unassigned Time–School time for which the student earns no credit such as lunch periods or study period. 

Vandalism–Willful or malicious destruction or defacement of public or private property.

Weapons–Weapons, guns, knives, “look-alikes” or any device attempted to be used to cause bodily harm, (including, but not limited to locks, pens, pencils, bats, etc.) and any other device defined by law as a weapon.

Section III

EXTRACURRICULAR CODE OF CONDUCT 

MAINE TOWNSHIP HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT 207

MAINE EAST HIGH SCHOOL

MAINE SOUTH HIGH SCHOOL

MAINE WEST HIGH SCHOOL

FROST ACADEMY

 

PHILOSOPHY

Maine Township High School District 207 offers a variety of extracurricular programs to provide additional opportunities to students.  Participation in these activities is highly encouraged but remains a privilege.  Students choosing to participate in these activities accept the responsibility of representing their school both in the community and at school.  These extended responsibilities include holding students who choose to participate to a higher standard of conduct as a condition of participation.  The goals of an extracurricular program are to offer students direction in developing healthy living habits, discipline, leadership, teamwork, citizenship skills and respect for structure, rules and responsibilities.  Individual initiative, character and teamwork can only be developed when there is team cooperation with established procedures.  We believe this Code will help make participation in our extracurricular program a strong and enduring learning experience.  District 207 staff remains committed to developing the whole person.

PURPOSE 

All students involved in extracurricular activities shall comply with these rules and regulations and conduct themselves in a manner that will bring credit and honor to themselves, their schools and their communities.  The Code defines the specific rules for student participation in extracurricular activities and guidelines and procedures to be followed for violations, which may also be applied to student behaviors as defined in Section II of the District 207 Discipline Procedures. 

PROHIBITED CONDUCT

Prohibited conduct is any possession, delivery or use of a prohibited substance or look-alikes and any criminal activity, including involvement with gang-related activities and/or secret organizations.                                                                                                                 

DEFINITION OF TERMS

Prohibited substances are:

  • All alcohol, regardless of vessel of travel.
  • Tobacco, vaping
  • All “controlled substances” such as Cannabis, Ecstasy any and all “controlled substances” as defined in Illinois law (see 20ILCS 570/102, Section 102(f)) except when prescribed for a student by a licensed physician.
  • Any drug paraphernalia, as defined in Illinois law (see for example 720 ILCS 600/2 Sec. 2(d)) such as but not limited to pipes, one-hitters, rolling papers or any device or item that contains residue of an illegal substance.
  • Any anabolic steroid.
  • Any substance used to achieve an altered mental state or “high” or artificially boost performance.

Use:  any student who has consumed or used any amount of tobacco, vaping, a controlled substance, marijuana, alcohol or intoxicants will be considered under the influence.

Possession:  any student having knowledge of, and any control over, an item.  Control includes, but is not limited to, having access to an item in a school locker, personal effects, a vehicle, or other place where the item is located.  It is not necessary that a student intended to control the item.  A student may acquire knowledge of an item visually, by being told about the item, or through other sensory perception.  A student’s knowledge will be determined based on the surrounding circumstances, not just the student’s statements. For example, “forgetting” that an item is in one’s locker, personal effects or vehicle does not constitute a lack of knowledge. A student also acquires knowledge when that student attends a party or event at which minors are in possession of or consuming a prohibited substance.  A student who is in attendance at a party where minors are in possession of or consuming a prohibited substance is considered to be in possession of that substance.

Delivery:  a transfer, or attempted transfer, of possession or control to another person whether or not the substance or item is in that person’s immediate presence.  Delivery includes, but is not limited to any gift, exchange, sale or other transfer with or without payment or other consideration. 

Look-alike:  any substance or item which is not, but reasonably appears to be, or is represented to be a Prohibited Substance.  Examples include, but are not limited to (a) a green leafy plant material, which is not, but is claimed, believed or intended to appear to be marijuana; and (b) a white powdered substance which is not, but is claimed, believed or intended to appear to be a toxic chemical or biological agent.

Extracurricular Activities:  include all activities sponsored or approved by District 207 or any of its schools other than academic classes, such as but not limited to athletics, band, plays, choral groups and clubs.

Criminal Activity:  any activity that would constitute a violation of any state or federal criminal law, other than minor traffic offenses.  However, proof beyond a reasonable doubt is not required.

Gang and/or Secret Organization Affiliation:  any ongoing organization, association or group of three (3) or more persons whether formal or informal, having as one of its primary activities the commission of one or more criminal acts or acts in violation of school rules, that may have an identifiable name or identifying sign or symbol, and whose members individually or collectively engage in or have engaged in a pattern of criminal activity or activity relating to the violation of school rules.  

Review Board:  the Associate Principal for Student Experience in addition to the Athletic Director or Fine Arts Chairperson as well as a guidance counselor, coach, club/activities sponsor, social worker, dean or other school personnel that are appropriate as determined solely by the Principal shall constitute the school Review Board.

APPLICATION OF CODE

This Code of Conduct is in effect 24 hours a day, every day of the calendar year.  It applies to incidents of Prohibited Conduct on or off school property, whether in season or not, and whether school is in session or not.  Violations of the code accumulate throughout a student’s high school career.

Violations of the Code are limited to incidents of Prohibited Conduct verified by District 207 staff or law enforcement agencies or by an admission of guilt.  Direct reports from law enforcement agencies of Prohibited Conduct will be investigated.  Arrest for criminal activity or reasonable evidence of criminal activity, may result in imposition of consequences under this Code.  Anonymous or secondhand reports of possible Prohibited Conduct will not be investigated absent substantive confirming information.  A Code violation is verified if, by the information available, it appears more likely than not a Code violation has occurred.

The consequences of Prohibited Conduct in violation of this Code are separate from and in addition to those assigned for violating school rules, school district policies and the law.  This Code in no way limits the authority of the administration, coaches, club sponsors or the Board of Education to impose other or additional consequences in accord with school rules and district policies.

Any student who represents himself/herself to District 207 staff, as having a substance abuse problem will have full practice and participation privileges as long as the following conditions are deemed satisfied by the District 207 administration:

  1. admission of the abuse is not initiated by the student as a means of escaping disciplinary action;
  2. the student and/or parents(s) receive counseling;
  3. the student and/or parent(s) provide proof of their successful completion of such counseling; and
  4. the student does not violate any of the Code rules after he/she admits to abuse.
PROCEDURES

The following procedure will take place in enforcing the Extracurricular Code:

  1. Reasonably credible reports of violations of this Code will be investigated by the Principal or designee at the school at which the student is enrolled.  The investigation will include an interview of the student and parental notification.
  2. After completion of the investigation, the Principal will consult with the Executive Committee for a determination as to whether a violation of the Code has occurred.
  3. At the direction of the Principal after the Executive Committee’s determination, the Assistant Principal for Students will schedule a Review Board hearing within three (3) school days of the completion of the investigation of the misconduct.  Parents or guardians, students and other appropriate school staff will be invited to participate in the hearing. (South has different practice)
  4. The Review Board will consider all the relevant information, including the student’s cooperation, and apply consequences appropriate to the circumstances, including prohibiting the student’s participation in practices and rehearsals.
  5. If new information becomes available, parents may request a second Review Board hearing from the Assistant Principal for Students. 
  6. The student or his/her parent or guardian may request a review of the Review Board’s decision by the Principal.  This request must be made in writing to the Principal within five (5) business days of the receipt of the Review Board’s decision and must articulate the reason(s) that a review should be granted.
  7. The Principal will determine if the consequences should be upheld, reversed or modified.  An appeal of the Principal’s decision must be filed with the Superintendent within five (5) business days of the delivery or attempted delivery of the Principal’s decision.
CONSEQUENCES

A principle purpose of this code is to deter Prohibited Conduct; accordingly, the Assistant Principal for Students, the Review Board, the Principal, the administrative staff and others involved in effecting this code shall do so in a manner which takes into consideration the rehabilitation of students who have engaged in Prohibited Conduct.  Among other steps, consequences may be deferred or abated for students who: 1.) Enroll in a school-approved intervention program; 2.) Commit to perform community service, such as speaking to student groups about their experience, or other services approved by the Review Board; and   3.) Otherwise redress their conduct and undertake steps to avoid future Prohibited Conduct.

Subject to the foregoing, students who are found to have violated this code of conduct will be suspended from participation in extracurricular activities in accordance with the guidelines set forth below.  The Assistant Principal for Students and the Principal upon review shall have the discretion to determine the severity of the consequences, based on the circumstances surrounding the misconduct.  A student not involved in extracurricular activities at the time of the violation will be assigned a consequence beginning upon his/her next involvement in an extracurricular activity.

Any assigned consequences for the Code violation are in effect during any request for a review.  A student suspended from school shall be ineligible to attend or participate in any extracurricular activities during the period of suspension unless the Assistant Principal for Students determines otherwise.

PENALTIES FOR PROHIBITED CONDUCT

1st Offense:  The student will be suspended from participation in the extracurricular activity.  The Review Board shall have discretion to determine the date(s), duration, and nature of all suspensions.  Generally, the student may be prohibited from participating in up to 40% of the extracurricular activity.  If the current extracurricular activity ends before the suspension is completed, the suspension will be completed or served in the first extracurricular activity in which the student next participates.  The student may choose to participate in a District 207 approved intervention program, for example substance abuse, to reduce the suspension to half the assigned consequence.  Failure to successfully complete the program will result in the student serving the full and original consequence.

2nd Offense:  A second violation of the code will result in suspension from all extracurricular activities for up to one calendar year from the date of the Review Board’s decision.  

3rd Offense:  The student may be excluded from all extracurricular activities for the remainder of his/her high school career in Maine Township District 207.

An account including investigation, details and findings for a student’s 2nd or 3rd offense under this Code, along with a description of the consequences imposed, shall be provided to the Board of Education by the Review Board.

ACTIVITIES COVERED BY THE EXTRACURRICULAR CODE OF CONDUCT

All participants in school-related sports, student productions, student activities and qualifying clubs and student organizations are covered by this Code.

LETTER REGARDING UNDERAGE DRINKING

Dear Parent(s)/Guardian(s):

A child’s wellbeing in and out of school is important to the schools and district. One area of concern for parents/guardians and educators across the country is underage drinking. Alcohol use can cause destructive behavior that has long-lasting consequences for a child’s health, behavior and school performance regardless of when and where consumption takes place. It can also lead to increases in risky behavior.

According to national statistics, in cases of alcohol-involved drivers, the rate of fatal crashes for drivers between 16 and 20 years old is more than twice that for drivers older than 20. Studies have shown that regular alcohol consumption by minors also corresponds to increased rates of suicide, sexual assault, high-risk sex, fighting, crime and alcohol dependence. No one fully understands the lifetime consequences of alcohol consumption on the developing brain, but studies have shown weakened memory, and worsening of school performance due to increased truancy and learning impairments.

It is illegal for any person under 21 years of age to acquire, possess, or consume alcoholic beverages. Board policies prohibit alcohol use by students. Board policies also prohibit children from (a) alcohol use, possession, distribution, purchase, or sale at school or school functions, and (b) attending school or school functions under the influence of alcohol. In addition, there are many state laws that carry heavy penalties for both students and parents around the use of alcohol.

  • State law indicates that any person under the age of 21 who has consumed alcohol and operated or been in actual physical control of a motor vehicle may be requested to submit to tests to determine alcohol content. If that person refuses the test or has an alcohol concentration greater than .00, his or her driver’s license will be suspended for 3 months to one year (625 ILCS 5/11-501.1(c). Consumption of alcohol by a minor is a Class C misdemeanor. Minors convicted of alcohol possession in a public space face up to six months in jail and a $500 fine, plus court costs and court-ordered evaluations and counseling. If a person under the age of 21 pleads guilty to, or is found guilty of, consuming alcohol while under the age of 21, he or she will lose his or her driving privileges for at least 3 months, even if the person was not driving, and even if he or she gets court supervision (a non-conviction sentence) (235 ILCS 5/10-1(e) and 625 ILCS 5/6-206(a)(43).
  • Conviction for using a fake ID to obtain alcohol is a Class A misdemeanor. Punishment carries a fine of not less than $500 and requires at least 25 hours of community service. It may also affect driving privileges. If possible, any community service must be performed for an alcohol abuse prevention program (235 ILCS 5/6-16(a)(i) and 625 ILCS 5/6-206(a).
  • Any parent/guardian or other adult who furnishes alcohol to a minor, or who allows his or her residence to be used for the unlawful possession or consumption of alcohol by minors, may be charged with a Class A misdemeanor punishable by a fine and/or jail for up to 1 year. Where a violation directly or indirectly results in great bodily harm or death to any person, the crime is a class 4 felony, punishable by 1 to 3 years in prison and up to a $25,000 fine (235 ILCS 5/6-16(a-1).
  • Any parent/guardian or other adult who provides alcohol (such as at a home party) may be liable in a civil action for monetary damages totaling up to $100,000. The action may be sought by someone who suffers personal injury, loss of support, or property loss through the actions of an intoxicated minor whose intoxication resulted from a parent/guardian or another adult giving the minor alcohol (235 ILCS 5/6-21).
  • Driving while under the influence of alcohol is a Class A misdemeanor punishable by fine and/or jail for up to one year. By driving a motor vehicle anywhere in Illinois, a person gives implied consent to a test to determine the alcoholic/drug content of his/her blood. If a person refuses to submit to the test, his/her license will automatically be suspended (625 ILCS 5/11-501).
  • It is unlawful for any person to transport, carry, possess, or have any alcoholic liquor within the passenger area of any motor vehicle except in the original container and with the seal unbroken (625 ILCS 5/11-502).

In conclusion, the District encourages all parents and students to discuss alcohol use and the consequences in order to prevent underage drinking by our students. Studies have shown that parents have the most influence on students with relation to not drinking alcohol. The schools and district are a partner in this effort and supports efforts to prevent underage drinking. For more information on underage drinking and how to talk to your child about it, please see the following links:

Sincerely,

Dr. Ken Wallace

Superintendent

 

LETTER REGARDING STUDENT SAFETY

Dear Parent(s)/Guardian(s):

Student safety is the district’s top priority. The district has developed a Comprehensive Safety and Security Plan. In addition to physical safety, the district is concerned with students’ emotional well-being and will help students cope with an emergency or disaster and its aftermath. The following outlines our emergency and disaster response plans.

School Emergency Operations Plan (EOP)

  1. The District has plans for all four phases of emergency and disaster management:
  2. Prevention – the capabilities needed to avoid, deter, or stop an incident.
  3. Preparation – the capabilities needed to: (a) protect students, teachers, staff, visitors, networks and property against threats or hazards, and (b) mitigate the likelihood of an incident or to reduce the impact of one.
  4. Response – the capabilities needed to stabilize an incident, save lives, establish a safe and secure environment, and facilitate the transition to recovery.
  5. Recovery – the capabilities needed to restore the learning environment. These phases are covered in each school Emergency Operations Plan. In addition, the District has a District Safety Coordinator and each school has a Safety Team. State law requires the District to annually review its plans.

Communications to Stakeholders

The District monitors the Homeland Security Office and other emergency preparedness resources. The District will share emergency information via its website, email, phone and/or the media.

Emergency Responses

Emergency responses will depend on the circumstances and may include evacuation or lockdown depending upon the threat and available information. The school and district will make decisions that are in the best interest of students and staff. For evacuation purposes, each school has at least one off-campus site. In the event the school is evacuated, the school will attempt to notify parents as soon as possible at the home and/or emergency telephone numbers on file. It is important that you maintain updated contact information with the school. The pick up location and instructions will be provided in the event of an evacuation, including alternative methods to return your child home.

Cooperation and Assistance Request

During any emergency or potential disaster and for the safety of all students and staff, we request that you follow the instructions of the District Director of Security, school principal and other school/district personnel. Those instructions will be widely disseminated. Thank you for your support and cooperation.

Sincerely,

Dr. Ken Wallace

Superintendent

 

LETTER REGARDING SOCIAL MEDIA

Dear Parent(s)/Guardian(s):

Staying on top of social media trends is important for parents/guardians. The district wants you to be aware that the following social media apps have the potential to disrupt the school environment by becoming a platform for bullying, unlawful behaviors, and other dangers:

  • Hyperlocal social media apps, e.g., YikYak, present safety and security concerns for students. Hyperlocal apps use GPS on cell phones to target groups in specific areas.
  • Temporary social media apps, e.g., ask.fm, Snapchat, Burn Note, Whisper, and Secret, often present a false belief of anonymity. Temporary apps allow people to send messages and images that self-delete after a set window of time.

Students need to understand that their online choices are important. Content never truly goes away and no one online is anonymous. Law enforcement agencies have the ability to pinpoint users and content creators, and they do investigate crimes involving the internet and social media app usage.

The district encourages you to review the resources below and talk with your children. The district and schools serve as a partner to help children understand how their digital footprints affect their and others’ futures. As you discuss this topic with your child, please remind him or her how to report his or her concerns:

  1. Tell your child to take a screenshot when appropriate or does not include illegal content such as child pornography or video (when screen shot not possible), of the content and show you or another trusted adult. Always encourage open conversations about what is happening online. When age-appropriate, discuss that possession and forwarding of sexted images violates federal and state child pornography laws.
  2. Use the reporting mechanisms within the social media apps.
  3. When a situation begins to disrupt your child’s education, report it to your child’s school.

Resources about Social Media Apps and Protecting Your Child Online 

www.commonsensemedia.org – this site discusses apps, movies, and more by just typing in the app you want to learn more about through summary information.

https://www.stopbullying.gov/cyberbullying/digital-awareness-for-parents/index.html – this site share information about preventing cyberbullying and what to do if your child is a victim of cyberbulling.

https://www.justice.gov/criminal-ceos/children-internet-safety – this site provides information about internet safety.

Sincerely,

Dr. Ken Wallace

Superintendent

 

LETTER REGARDING SEXTING

Dear Parent(s)/Guardian(s):

Many parents are unfamiliar with sexting. It is generally defined as sending, sharing, viewing, receiving or possessing indecent visual depictions of oneself or another person using a cell phone. A student will be disciplined for sexting at school.

Discussing sexting and its legal and social consequences with your children may prevent and reduce incidences of it at school and elsewhere. A recent survey revealed that about 20 percent of teen boys and girls have sent sext messages. It can cause enormous emotional pain for the students involved and often results in legal implications. The following talking points from the American Academy of Pediatrics may help start the discussion between parents and students.

  • Introduce the issue as soon as a child is old enough to have a cell phone. Even if the issue hasn’t directly impacted your school building’s community, ask “have you heard of sexting?” “Tell me what you think it is.” Learn what your child’s understanding is and add an age appropriate explanation. For more information about starting age appropriate discussions, see these websites:
  • Make sure students understand that the district’s student discipline policy prohibits sexting at school, and that it is further punishable in Illinois through the Juvenile Court Act and The Criminal Code of 2012.
  • Collect cell phones at gatherings of tweens and teens. Experts have noted that peer pressure can play a major role in sexting, with attendance at parties being a major contributing factor.
  • Monitor the media for stories about sexting that illustrate the consequences for both senders and receivers of these images. Ask “Have you seen this story?” “What did you think about it?” “What would you do if you were this child?”
  • Rehearse ways your child can respond if asked to participate in sexting.

Sincerely,

Dr. Ken Wallace

Superintendent